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Open AccessArticle

Iodine Intake Estimation from the Consumption of Instant Noodles, Drinking Water and Household Salt in Indonesia

1
Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN), Menara Palma 7th Floor, Jln. HR Rasuna Said Blok X2 kav 6, Jakarta 12950, Indonesia
2
National Institute for Health Research and Development, Jln. Percetakan Negara No. 29, Jakarta 10560, Indonesia
3
Ministry of Health Indonesia Direktorat Jenderal Kesehatan Masyarakat, Jln. HR. Rasuna Said Blok X-5 Kav. 4-9, Jakarta 12950, Indonesia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(3), 324; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10030324
Received: 26 December 2017 / Revised: 24 February 2018 / Accepted: 7 March 2018 / Published: 8 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Iodine and Health throughout the Lifecourse)
The objective of this study was to assess the contribution of iodine intake from iodised household salt, iodised salt in instant noodles, and iodine in ground water in five regions of Indonesia. Secondary data analysis was performed using the 2013 Primary Health Research Survey, the 2014 Total Diet Study, and data from food industry research. Iodine intake was estimated among 2719 children, 10–12 years of age (SAC), 13,233 women of reproductive age (WRA), and 578 pregnant women (PW). Combined estimated iodine intake from the three stated sources met 78%, 70%, and 41% of iodine requirements for SAC, WRA and PW, respectively. Household salt iodine contributed about half of the iodine requirements for SAC (49%) and WRA (48%) and a quarter for PW (28%). The following variations were found: for population group, the percentage of estimated dietary iodine requirements met by instant noodle consumption was significantly higher among SAC; for region, estimated iodine intake was significantly higher from ground water for WRA in Java, and from household salt for SAC and WRA in Kalimantan and Java; and for household socio-economic status (SES), iodine intake from household salt was significantly higher in the highest SES households. Enforcement of clear implementing regulations for iodisation of household and food industry salt will promote optimal iodine intake among all population groups with different diets. View Full-Text
Keywords: modelling iodine intake; iodine intake; iodised salt; food industry; Indonesia modelling iodine intake; iodine intake; iodised salt; food industry; Indonesia
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Sutrisna, A.; Knowles, J.; Basuni, A.; Menon, R.; Sugihantono, A. Iodine Intake Estimation from the Consumption of Instant Noodles, Drinking Water and Household Salt in Indonesia. Nutrients 2018, 10, 324.

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