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Nutrients 2018, 10(12), 1877; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10121877

Inverse Association between Organic Food Purchase and Diabetes Mellitus in US Adults

1,†
,
1,†
,
1
,
1
,
2,3
,
2,3,4
and
1,5,6,*
1
Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
2
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
3
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
4
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
5
Obesity Research and Education Initiative, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
6
Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
The authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 October 2018 / Revised: 10 November 2018 / Accepted: 26 November 2018 / Published: 3 December 2018
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Abstract

Background: The organic food market has grown rapidly worldwide in the past 15 years. However, evidence concerning the health effects of organic foods is scarce. We evaluated the cross-sectional association of organic food purchase, as a proxy of organic food consumption, with diabetes in a nationally representative population. Methods: We included 8199 participants aged ≥20 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2008 and 2009–2010. Organic food purchase and frequency were ascertained by questionnaires. Diabetes was defined as a self-reported physician diagnosis or a hemoglobin A1c level ≥6.5% or both. We used logistic regression with sample weights to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Individuals who reported purchasing organic foods were less likely to have diabetes compared to those who did not report organic food purchase. After adjustment for age, gender, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes, socioeconomic status, and dietary and lifestyle factors, the OR of diabetes associated with organic food purchase was 0.80 (95% CI 0.68–0.93). The association remained significant after additional adjustment for BMI with OR of 0.80 (0.69–0.94). Conclusions: In a nationally representative population, frequent organic food purchase was inversely associated with diabetes prevalence in adults in the United States. View Full-Text
Keywords: organic food purchase; diabetes; NHANES; cross-sectional; population-based organic food purchase; diabetes; NHANES; cross-sectional; population-based
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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Sun, Y.; Liu, B.; Du, Y.; Snetselaar, L.G.; Sun, Q.; Hu, F.B.; Bao, W. Inverse Association between Organic Food Purchase and Diabetes Mellitus in US Adults. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1877.

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