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Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1818; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111818

A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Pilot Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Effect of Supplementation with Prebiotic Synergy 1 on Iron Homeostasis in Children and Adolescents with Celiac Disease Treated with a Gluten-Free Diet

1
Department of Pediatrics, Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Collegium Medicum Faculty of Medicine, University of Warmia & Mazury, Oczapowskiego 2 Str., 10-719 Olsztyn, Poland
2
Department of Chemistry and Biodynamics of Food, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10 Str., 10-748 Olsztyn, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 October 2018 / Revised: 31 October 2018 / Accepted: 16 November 2018 / Published: 21 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics and Prebiotics in Pediatrics)
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Abstract

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) occurs in 15–46% of patients with celiac disease (CD), and in some cases, it may be its only manifestation. Studies in animal models have shown that prebiotics, including inulin, may help to increase intestinal absorption of iron. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a prebiotic, oligofructose-enriched inulin (Synergy 1), on iron homeostasis in non-anemic children and adolescents with celiac disease (CD) in association with a gluten-free diet (GFD). Thirty-four CD patients (4–18 years old) were randomized into two groups receiving Synergy 1 (10 g/day) or a placebo (maltodextrin) for three months. Before and after intervention, blood samples were collected from all patients for assessment of blood morphology, biochemical parameters and serum hepcidin concentration. We found that serum hepcidin concentration after the intervention was significantly decreased by 60.9% (p = 0.046) in the Synergy 1 group, whereas no significant difference was observed in the placebo group. No differences in morphological and biochemical blood parameters (including ferritin, hemoglobin and C-reactive protein (CRP)) were observed after intervention in either group. Given that hepcidin decrease may improve intestinal iron absorption, these results warrant further investigation in a larger cohort and especially in patients with IDA. View Full-Text
Keywords: celiac disease; iron deficiency anemia; gluten-free diet; inulin; prebiotics; iron absorption; hepcidin celiac disease; iron deficiency anemia; gluten-free diet; inulin; prebiotics; iron absorption; hepcidin
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Feruś, K.; Drabińska, N.; Krupa-Kozak, U.; Jarocka-Cyrta, E. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Pilot Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Effect of Supplementation with Prebiotic Synergy 1 on Iron Homeostasis in Children and Adolescents with Celiac Disease Treated with a Gluten-Free Diet. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1818.

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