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Gluten-Free Diet and Its ‘Cousins’ in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

1
Academic Unit of Gastroenterology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield S10 2JF, UK
2
Academic Unit of Gastroenterology, Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S10 2RX, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1727; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111727
Received: 11 October 2018 / Revised: 7 November 2018 / Accepted: 8 November 2018 / Published: 11 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gluten-Free Diet)
Functional disorders are common, with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) being the commonest and most extensively evaluated functional bowel disorder. It is therefore paramount that effective therapies are available to treat this common condition. Diet appears to play a pivotal role in symptom generation in IBS, with a recent interest in the role of dietary therapies in IBS. Over the last decade, there has been a substantial increase in awareness of the gluten-free diet (GFD), with a recent focus of the role of a GFD in IBS. There appears to be emerging evidence for the use of a GFD in IBS, with studies demonstrating the induction of symptoms following gluten in patients with IBS. However, there are questions with regards to which components of wheat lead to symptom generation, as well as the effect of a GFD on nutritional status, gut microbiota and long-term outcomes. Further studies are required, although the design of dietary studies remain challenging. The implementation of a GFD should be performed by a dietitian with a specialist interest in IBS, which could be achieved via the delivery of group sessions. View Full-Text
Keywords: non-coeliac gluten sensitivity; gluten; wheat; low FODMAP diet; irritable bowel syndrome non-coeliac gluten sensitivity; gluten; wheat; low FODMAP diet; irritable bowel syndrome
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rej, A.; Sanders, D.S. Gluten-Free Diet and Its ‘Cousins’ in Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1727. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111727

AMA Style

Rej A, Sanders DS. Gluten-Free Diet and Its ‘Cousins’ in Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Nutrients. 2018; 10(11):1727. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111727

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rej, Anupam, and David Surendran Sanders. 2018. "Gluten-Free Diet and Its ‘Cousins’ in Irritable Bowel Syndrome" Nutrients 10, no. 11: 1727. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111727

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