Next Article in Journal
Gluten-Free Diet and Its ‘Cousins’ in Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Previous Article in Journal
Short-Term Effects of Healthy Eating Pattern Cycling on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors: Pooled Results from Two Randomized Controlled Trials
Article Menu
Issue 11 (November) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1726; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111726

Comparison of Low Glycaemic Index and High Glycaemic Index Potatoes in Relation to Satiety: A Single-Blinded, Randomised Crossover Study in Humans

Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg, Denmark
These authors contribute equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 8 October 2018 / Revised: 31 October 2018 / Accepted: 8 November 2018 / Published: 10 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Relationship between Glycemic Index and Human Health)
Full-Text   |   PDF [1406 KB, uploaded 13 November 2018]   |  

Abstract

High glycaemic index (GI) foods have been proposed to reduce satiety and thus promote overweight and obesity. Generally, potatoes have a high GI, but they also provide many beneficial nutrients and they are a highly important food source globally. In this study, we investigated how a low GI potato affected subjective satiety as compared to a high GI potato. Twenty healthy men (aged 18–40 years; body mass index (BMI) 18–27 kg/m2) participated in this single-blinded, controlled, randomised crossover trial. On each of the two trial days, the subjects were given a 500-gram portion of either a low or high GI potato variety (Carisma® low GI and Arizona high GI). Subjective appetite sensations were measured at baseline and at +15 min, +45 min, +75 min, +105 min, and +135 min after consumption of the test meal until an ad libitum meal was served at +150 min. No significant differences in the primary endpoint, satiety, were found between the two potato varieties (all p > 0.05). Furthermore, no significant differences were found in the secondary endpoints; hunger, fullness, and prospective food consumption, or ad libitum energy intake (all p > 0.05). In conclusion, the results of this study do not indicate that the GI of potatoes is important for satiety in normal-weight men. View Full-Text
Keywords: appetite; obesity; eating behaviour; GI; ad libitum energy intake; hunger; fullness; prospective food consumption; Carisma; Arizona appetite; obesity; eating behaviour; GI; ad libitum energy intake; hunger; fullness; prospective food consumption; Carisma; Arizona
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Andersen, S.S.H.; Heller, J.M.F.; Hansen, T.T.; Raben, A. Comparison of Low Glycaemic Index and High Glycaemic Index Potatoes in Relation to Satiety: A Single-Blinded, Randomised Crossover Study in Humans. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1726.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top