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Open AccessArticle

African Nightshade (Solanum scabrum Mill.): Impact of Cultivation and Plant Processing on Its Health Promoting Potential as Determined in a Human Liver Cell Model

1
Molecular Preventive Medicine, Institute for Infection Prevention and Hospital Epidemiology, University Medical Center and Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Breisacher Strasse 115b, 79106 Freiburg, Germany
2
Institute of Food Chemistry, Hamburg School of Food Science, University of Hamburg, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
3
Leibniz Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops, Theodor-Echtermeyer-Weg 1, 14979 Großbeeren, Germany
4
Department of Food Chemistry, Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany
5
Division Urban Plant Ecophysiology, Faculty of Life Science, Humboldt University Berlin, Lentzeallee 55/57, 14195 Berlin, Germany
6
Max Rubner-Institut, Federal Research Centre for Nutrition and Food, Institute of Safety and Quality of Fruits and Vegetables, Haid-und-Neu Strasse 9, D-76131 Karlsruhe, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1532; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101532
Received: 20 September 2018 / Revised: 8 October 2018 / Accepted: 10 October 2018 / Published: 17 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Food, Nutrition and Human Health)
Plant cultivation and processing may impact nutrient and phytochemical content of vegetables. The present study aimed at determining the influence of cultivation and processing on the health promoting capacity of African nightshade (Solanum scabrum Mill.) leaves, an indigenous vegetable, rich in nutrients and phytochemicals. Anti-genotoxicity against the human liver carcinogen aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) as determined by the comet assay and radical oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capacity of ethanolic and aqueous extracts were investigated in human derived liver (HepG2) cells. ROS scavenging activity was assessed using electron paramagnetic spin resonance and quantification of ARE/Nrf2 mediated gene expression. The cultivation was done under different environmental conditions. The processing included fermentation and cooking; postharvest ultraviolet irradiation (UV-C) treatment was also investigated. Overall, S. scabrum extracts showed strong health promoting potential, the highest potential was observed with the fermented extract, which showed a 60% reduction of AFB1 induced DNA damage and a 38% reduction in FeSO4 induced oxidative stress. The content of total polyphenols, carotenoids and chlorophylls was indeed affected by cultivation and processing. Based on the present in vitro findings consumption of S. scabrum leaves could be further encouraged, preferentially after cooking or fermentation of the plant. View Full-Text
Keywords: aflatoxin B1; African indigenous vegetables; anti-genotoxicity; anti-oxidant activity; cancer chemoprevention; Solanaceae aflatoxin B1; African indigenous vegetables; anti-genotoxicity; anti-oxidant activity; cancer chemoprevention; Solanaceae
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Odongo, G.A.; Schlotz, N.; Baldermann, S.; Neugart, S.; Huyskens-Keil, S.; Ngwene, B.; Trierweiler, B.; Schreiner, M.; Lamy, E. African Nightshade (Solanum scabrum Mill.): Impact of Cultivation and Plant Processing on Its Health Promoting Potential as Determined in a Human Liver Cell Model. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1532.

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