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Correction published on 30 November 2018, see Nutrients 2018, 10(12), 1839.
Open AccessArticle

Effect of Consumption Heated Oils with or without Dietary Cholesterol on the Development of Atherosclerosis

1
Malaysian Palm Oil Board, No. 6, Persiaran Institusi, Bandar Baru Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor, Malaysia
2
Malaysian Palm Oil Council, 2nd Floor, Wisma Sawit, Lot 6, SS6, Jalan Perbandaran, 47301 Kelana Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia
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Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
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Laboratory of Food Safety and Food Integrity, Institute of Tropical Agriculture and Food Security, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
5
Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1527; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101527
Received: 1 October 2018 / Revised: 10 October 2018 / Accepted: 13 October 2018 / Published: 17 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cholesterol and Nutrition)
Heating oils and fats for a considerable length of time results in chemical reactions, leading to the aggravation of a free radical processes, which ultimately contributes to atherosclerosis. Our study focused on elucidating the effect of feeding heated oils with or without dietary cholesterol on the development of atherosclerosis in rabbits. We heated palm olein and corn oil at 180 °C for 18 h and 9 h per day, respectively, for two consecutive days. Next, 20 male rabbits were divided into four groups and fed the following diet for 12 weeks: (i) heated palm olein (HPO); (ii) HPO with cholesterol (HPOC); (iii) heated corn oil (HCO); and (iv) HCO with cholesterol (HCOC). Plasma total cholesterol (TC) was significantly lower in the HCO group compared to the HCOC group. Atherosclerotic lesion scores for both fatty plaques and fatty streaks were significantly higher in the HCO and HCOC groups as compared to the HPO and HPOC groups. Additionally, fibrous plaque scores were also higher in the HCO and HCOC groups as compared to the HPO and HPOC groups. These results suggest that heated palm oil confers protection against the onset of atherosclerosis compared to heated polyunsaturated oils in a rabbit model. View Full-Text
Keywords: heated fats; cholesterol; atherosclerosis; corn oil; palm olein heated fats; cholesterol; atherosclerosis; corn oil; palm olein
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MDPI and ACS Style

Idris, C.A.C.; Sundram, K.; Razis, A.F.A. Effect of Consumption Heated Oils with or without Dietary Cholesterol on the Development of Atherosclerosis. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1527. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101527

AMA Style

Idris CAC, Sundram K, Razis AFA. Effect of Consumption Heated Oils with or without Dietary Cholesterol on the Development of Atherosclerosis. Nutrients. 2018; 10(10):1527. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101527

Chicago/Turabian Style

Idris, Che A.C.; Sundram, Kalyana; Razis, Ahmad F.A. 2018. "Effect of Consumption Heated Oils with or without Dietary Cholesterol on the Development of Atherosclerosis" Nutrients 10, no. 10: 1527. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101527

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