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Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1428; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101428

Addictive Eating and Its Relation to Physical Activity and Sleep Behavior

1
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
2
Department of Dietetics, Sengkang General Hospital, Singapore Health Services, Singapore 544886, Singapore
3
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
4
School of Medicine & Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 7 August 2018 / Revised: 20 September 2018 / Accepted: 23 September 2018 / Published: 4 October 2018
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Abstract

The obesity epidemic has led to the exploration of factors contributing to its etiology. Addictive eating, physical activity, and sleep behaviors have all been independently associated with obesity, and recent research suggests plausible interrelationships between food addiction, physical activity, and sleep. This study aims to investigate the relationship between food addiction with physical activity and sleep behavior. Australian adults were invited to complete an online survey which collected information including: demographics, food addiction symptoms, physical activity, sitting time and sleep behavior items. The sample comprised 1344 individuals with a mean age of 39.8 ± 13.1 years (range 18–91), of which 75.7% were female. Twenty-two percent of the sample met the criteria for a diagnosis of food addiction as per the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS 2.0) criteria, consisting of 0.7% with a “mild” addiction, 2.6% “moderate”, and 18.9% classified as having a “severe” food addiction. Food-addicted individuals had significantly less physical activity (1.8 less occasions walking/week, 32 min less walking/week, 58 min less moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA)/week; p < 0.05), reported sitting for longer on weekends (83 min more on weekends/week; p < 0.001), and reported significantly more symptoms of poorer-quality sleep (more likely to snore, more likely to have fallen asleep while driving, reported more days of daytime falling asleep; p < 0.05) compared to non-food-addicted individuals. These differences were also observed in those with a “severe” food addiction classification. The present study suggests frequency and duration of physical activity, time spent sitting and sleep duration are associated with food addiction. View Full-Text
Keywords: food addiction; obesity; Yale Food Addiction Scale; physical activity; sedentary behavior; sleep behaviors; sleep duration; sleep quality food addiction; obesity; Yale Food Addiction Scale; physical activity; sedentary behavior; sleep behaviors; sleep duration; sleep quality
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Li, J.T.E.; Pursey, K.M.; Duncan, M.J.; Burrows, T. Addictive Eating and Its Relation to Physical Activity and Sleep Behavior. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1428.

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