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Article

Monitoring 2019 Forest Fires in Southeastern Australia with GNSS Technique

1
College of Geodesy and Geomatics, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590, China
2
Chinese Academy of Surveying and Mapping, Beijing 100036, China
3
Institute of Oceanographic Instrumentation, Qilu University of Technology (Shandong Academy of Sciences), Qingdao 266061, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(3), 386; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13030386
Received: 29 December 2020 / Revised: 20 January 2021 / Accepted: 20 January 2021 / Published: 22 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Modelling and Monitoring Using GNSS)
From late 2019 to early 2020, forest fires in southeastern Australia caused huge economic losses and huge environmental pollution. Monitoring forest fires has become increasingly important. A new method of fire detection using the difference between global navigation satellite system (GNSS)-derived precipitable water vapor and radiosonde-derived precipitable water vapor (ΔPWV) is proposed. To study the feasibility of the new method, the relationship is studied between particulate matter 10 (PM10) (2.5 to 10 microns particulate matter) and ΔPWV based on Global Positioning System (GPS) data, radiosonde data, and PM10 data from 1 June 2019 to 1 June 2020 in southeastern Australia. The results show that before the forest fire, ΔPWV and PM10 were smaller and less fluctuating. When the forest fire happened, ΔPWV and PM10 were increasing. Then after the forest fire, PM10 became small with relatively smooth fluctuations, but ΔPWV was larger and more fluctuating. Correlation between the 15-day moving standard deviation (STD) time series of ΔPWV and PM10 after the fire was significantly higher than that before the fire. This study shows that ΔPWV is effective in monitoring forest fires based on GNSS technique before and during forest fires in climates with more uniform precipitation, and using ΔPWV to detect forest fires based on GNSS needs to be further investigated in climates with more precipitation and severe climate change. View Full-Text
Keywords: Australian forest fires; global navigation satellite system (GNSS); precipitable water vapor (PWV); PM10; radiosonde Australian forest fires; global navigation satellite system (GNSS); precipitable water vapor (PWV); PM10; radiosonde
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MDPI and ACS Style

Guo, J.; Hou, R.; Zhou, M.; Jin, X.; Li, C.; Liu, X.; Gao, H. Monitoring 2019 Forest Fires in Southeastern Australia with GNSS Technique. Remote Sens. 2021, 13, 386. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13030386

AMA Style

Guo J, Hou R, Zhou M, Jin X, Li C, Liu X, Gao H. Monitoring 2019 Forest Fires in Southeastern Australia with GNSS Technique. Remote Sensing. 2021; 13(3):386. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13030386

Chicago/Turabian Style

Guo, Jinyun, Rui Hou, Maosheng Zhou, Xin Jin, Chengming Li, Xin Liu, and Hao Gao. 2021. "Monitoring 2019 Forest Fires in Southeastern Australia with GNSS Technique" Remote Sensing 13, no. 3: 386. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13030386

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