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Cross-Border Urban Change Detection and Growth Assessment for Mexican-USA Twin Cities

Institute of Rescue Engineering and Civil Protection, TH Köln—University of Applied Sciences, Betzdorferstr. 2, 50679 Cologne, Germany
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Academic Editors: Georgios Mallinis and Charalampos Georgiadis
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(21), 4422; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13214422
Received: 30 September 2021 / Revised: 29 October 2021 / Accepted: 1 November 2021 / Published: 3 November 2021
Remote sensing applications of change detection are increasingly in demand for many areas of land use and urbanization, and disaster risk reduction. The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction and the New Urban Agenda by the United Nations call for risk monitoring. This study maps and assesses the urban area changes of 23 Mexican-USA border cities with a remote sensing-based approach. A literature study on existing studies on hazard mapping and social vulnerability in those cities reveals a need for further studies on urban growth. Using a multi-modal combination of aerial, declassified (CORONA, GAMBIT, HEXAGON programs), and recent (Sentinel-2) satellite imagery, this study expands existing land cover change assessments by capturing urban growth back to the 1940s. A Geographic Information System and census data assessment results reveal that massive urban growth has occurred on both sides of the national border. On the Mexican side, population and area growth exceeds the US cities in many cases. In addition, flood hazard exposure has grown along with growing city sizes, despite structural river training. These findings indicate a need for more risk monitoring that includes remote sensing data. It has socio-economic implications, too, as the social vulnerability on Mexican and US sides differ. This study calls for the maintenance and expansion of open data repositories to enable such transboundary risk comparisons. Common vulnerability variable sets could be helpful to enable better comparisons as well as comparable flood zonation mapping techniques. To enable risk monitoring, basic data such as urban boundaries should be mapped per decade and provided on open data platforms in GIS formats and not just in map viewers. View Full-Text
Keywords: aerial image; satellite imagery; change detection; land-use change; urban sprawl; decision-support; sister-cities; Sendai Framework; New Urban Agenda; risk monitoring aerial image; satellite imagery; change detection; land-use change; urban sprawl; decision-support; sister-cities; Sendai Framework; New Urban Agenda; risk monitoring
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fekete, A.; Priesmeier, P. Cross-Border Urban Change Detection and Growth Assessment for Mexican-USA Twin Cities. Remote Sens. 2021, 13, 4422. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13214422

AMA Style

Fekete A, Priesmeier P. Cross-Border Urban Change Detection and Growth Assessment for Mexican-USA Twin Cities. Remote Sensing. 2021; 13(21):4422. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13214422

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fekete, Alexander, and Peter Priesmeier. 2021. "Cross-Border Urban Change Detection and Growth Assessment for Mexican-USA Twin Cities" Remote Sensing 13, no. 21: 4422. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13214422

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