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Communication

Sensing the Past: Perspectives on Collaborative Archaeology and Ground Penetrating Radar Techniques from Coastal California

1
Department of Anthropology, Michigan State University, 655 Auditorium Rd, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
2
Amah Mutsun Land Trust, Amah Mutsun Tribal Band, P.O. Box 6915, Albany, CA 94706, USA
3
Department of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, 232 Kroeber Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
4
Archaeological Research Facility, University of California, Berkeley, 2251 College Ave, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this research and share the credit as first-author.
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(2), 285; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13020285
Received: 10 November 2020 / Revised: 10 January 2021 / Accepted: 13 January 2021 / Published: 15 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Archaeology)
This paper summarizes over a decade of collaborative eco-archaeological research along the central coast of California involving researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, tribal citizens from the Amah Mutsun Tribal Band, and California Department of Parks and Recreation archaeologists. Our research employs remote sensing methods to document and assess cultural resources threatened by coastal erosion and geophysical methods to identify archaeological deposits, minimize impacts on sensitive cultural resources, and provide tribal and state collaborators with a suite of data to consider before proceeding with any form of invasive archaeological excavation. Our case study of recent eco-archaeological research developed to define the historical biogeography of threatened and endangered anadromous salmonids demonstrates how remote sensing technologies help identify dense archaeological deposits, remove barriers, and create bridges through equitable and inclusive research practices between archaeologists and the Amah Mutsun Tribal Band. These experiences have resulted in the incorporation of remote sensing techniques as a central approach of the Amah Mutsun Tribal Band when conducting archaeology in their traditional territories. View Full-Text
Keywords: Amah Mutsun Tribal Band; indigenous archaeology; collaborative archaeology; community-based participatory research; California archaeology; indigenous stewardship Amah Mutsun Tribal Band; indigenous archaeology; collaborative archaeology; community-based participatory research; California archaeology; indigenous stewardship
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sanchez, G.M.; Grone, M.A.; Apodaca, A.J.; Byram, R.S.; Lopez, V.; Jewett, R.A. Sensing the Past: Perspectives on Collaborative Archaeology and Ground Penetrating Radar Techniques from Coastal California. Remote Sens. 2021, 13, 285. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13020285

AMA Style

Sanchez GM, Grone MA, Apodaca AJ, Byram RS, Lopez V, Jewett RA. Sensing the Past: Perspectives on Collaborative Archaeology and Ground Penetrating Radar Techniques from Coastal California. Remote Sensing. 2021; 13(2):285. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13020285

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sanchez, Gabriel M., Michael A. Grone, Alec J. Apodaca, R. S. Byram, Valentin Lopez, and Roberta A. Jewett 2021. "Sensing the Past: Perspectives on Collaborative Archaeology and Ground Penetrating Radar Techniques from Coastal California" Remote Sensing 13, no. 2: 285. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13020285

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