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Technical Note

Visual Localization of the Tianwen-1 Lander Using Orbital, Descent and Rover Images

1
State Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing Science, Aerospace Information Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
2
Beijing Aerospace Control Center (BACC), Beijing 100094, China
3
CAS Center for Excellence in Comparative Planetology, Hefei 230026, China
4
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Giancarlo Bellucci and Christian Wöhler
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(17), 3439; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13173439
Received: 21 June 2021 / Revised: 11 August 2021 / Accepted: 25 August 2021 / Published: 30 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Planetary 3D Mapping, Remote Sensing and Machine Learning)
Tianwen-1, China’s first Mars exploration mission, was successfully landed in the southern part of Utopia Planitia on 15 May 2021 (UTC+8). Timely and accurately determining the landing location is critical for the subsequent mission operations. For timely localization, the remote landmarks, selected from the panorama generated by the earliest received Navigation and Terrain Cameras (NaTeCam) images, were matched with the Digital Orthophoto Map (DOM) generated by high resolution imaging camera (HiRIC) images to obtain the initial result based on the triangulation method. Then, the initial localization result was refined by the descent images received later and the NaTeCam DOM. Finally, the lander location was determined to be (25.066°N, 109.925°E). Verified by the new orbital image with the lander and Zhurong rover visible, the localization accuracy was within a pixel of the HiRIC DOM. View Full-Text
Keywords: Tianwen-1; lander localization; NaTeCam image; HiRIC image; descent image; landmark triangulation Tianwen-1; lander localization; NaTeCam image; HiRIC image; descent image; landmark triangulation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wan, W.; Yu, T.; Di, K.; Wang, J.; Liu, Z.; Li, L.; Liu, B.; Wang, Y.; Peng, M.; Bo, Z.; Ye, L.; Wang, R.; Yin, L.; Yang, M.; Shi, K.; He, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Lu, H.; Bao, S. Visual Localization of the Tianwen-1 Lander Using Orbital, Descent and Rover Images. Remote Sens. 2021, 13, 3439. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13173439

AMA Style

Wan W, Yu T, Di K, Wang J, Liu Z, Li L, Liu B, Wang Y, Peng M, Bo Z, Ye L, Wang R, Yin L, Yang M, Shi K, He X, Zhang Z, Zhang H, Lu H, Bao S. Visual Localization of the Tianwen-1 Lander Using Orbital, Descent and Rover Images. Remote Sensing. 2021; 13(17):3439. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13173439

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wan, Wenhui, Tianyi Yu, Kaichang Di, Jia Wang, Zhaoqin Liu, Lichun Li, Bin Liu, Yexin Wang, Man Peng, Zheng Bo, Lejia Ye, Runzhi Wang, Li Yin, Meiping Yang, Ke Shi, Ximing He, Zuoyu Zhang, Hui Zhang, Hao Lu, and Shuo Bao. 2021. "Visual Localization of the Tianwen-1 Lander Using Orbital, Descent and Rover Images" Remote Sensing 13, no. 17: 3439. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13173439

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