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Open AccessArticle

Geographic Disparity in Machine Intelligence Approaches for Archaeological Remote Sensing Research

Department of Anthropology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(6), 921; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12060921
Received: 7 February 2020 / Revised: 3 March 2020 / Accepted: 12 March 2020 / Published: 12 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Archaeology)
A vast majority of the archaeological record, globally, is understudied and increasingly threatened by climate change, economic and political instability, and violent conflict. Archaeological data are crucial for understanding the past, and as such, documentation of this information is imperative. The development of machine intelligence approaches (including machine learning, artificial intelligence, and other automated processes) has resulted in massive gains in archaeological knowledge, as such computational methods have expedited the rate of archaeological survey and discovery via remote sensing instruments. Nevertheless, the progression of automated computational approaches is limited by distinct geographic imbalances in where these techniques are developed and applied. Here, I investigate the degree of this disparity and some potential reasons for this imbalance. Analyses from Web of Science and Microsoft Academic searches reveal that there is a substantial difference between the Global North and South in the output of machine intelligence remote sensing archaeology literature. There are also regional imbalances. I argue that one solution is to increase collaborations between research institutions in addition to data sharing efforts. View Full-Text
Keywords: machine intelligence; remote sensing; archaeology; ethics; data sharing; automated analysis machine intelligence; remote sensing; archaeology; ethics; data sharing; automated analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Davis, D.S. Geographic Disparity in Machine Intelligence Approaches for Archaeological Remote Sensing Research. Remote Sens. 2020, 12, 921.

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