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Article

New Insights into Long-Term Aseismic Deformation and Regional Strain Rates from GNSS Data Inversion: The Case of the Pollino and Castrovillari Faults

1
Department of Earth Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milan, Italy
2
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo, 95125 Catania, Italy
3
Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Messina University, 98166 Messina, Italy
4
Politecnico di Milano, DICA, 20133 Milan, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(18), 2921; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12182921
Received: 30 June 2020 / Revised: 11 August 2020 / Accepted: 6 September 2020 / Published: 9 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ground Deformation Patterns Detection by InSAR and GNSS Techniques)
We present a novel inverse method for discriminating regional deformation and long-term fault creep by inversion of GNSS velocities observed at the spatial scale of intraplate faults by exploiting the different spatial signatures of these two mechanisms. In doing so our method provides a refined estimate of the upper bound of the strain accumulation process. As case study, we apply this method to a six year GNSS campaign (2003–2008) set up in the southern portion of the Pollino Range over the Castrovillari and Pollino faults. We show that regional deformation alone cannot explain the observed deformation pattern and implies high geodetic strain rate, with a WSW-ENE extension of 86±41×109/yr. Allowing for the possibility of fault creep, the modelling of GNSS velocities is consistent with their uncertainties and they are mainly explained by a shallow creep over the Pollino fault, with a normal/strike-slip mechanism up to 5 mm/yr. The regional strain rate decrease by about 70 percent and is characterized by WNW-ESE extension of 24±28×109/yr. The large uncertainties affecting our estimate of regional strain rate do not allow infering whether the tectonic regime of the area is extensional or strike-slip, although the latter is slightly more likely. View Full-Text
Keywords: regional deformation; fault creep; GNSS velocities; inverse theory regional deformation; fault creep; GNSS velocities; inverse theory
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cambiotti, G.; Palano, M.; Orecchio, B.; Marotta, A.M.; Barzaghi, R.; Neri, G.; Sabadini, R. New Insights into Long-Term Aseismic Deformation and Regional Strain Rates from GNSS Data Inversion: The Case of the Pollino and Castrovillari Faults. Remote Sens. 2020, 12, 2921. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12182921

AMA Style

Cambiotti G, Palano M, Orecchio B, Marotta AM, Barzaghi R, Neri G, Sabadini R. New Insights into Long-Term Aseismic Deformation and Regional Strain Rates from GNSS Data Inversion: The Case of the Pollino and Castrovillari Faults. Remote Sensing. 2020; 12(18):2921. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12182921

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cambiotti, Gabriele, Mimmo Palano, Barbara Orecchio, Anna M. Marotta, Riccardo Barzaghi, Giancarlo Neri, and Roberto Sabadini. 2020. "New Insights into Long-Term Aseismic Deformation and Regional Strain Rates from GNSS Data Inversion: The Case of the Pollino and Castrovillari Faults" Remote Sensing 12, no. 18: 2921. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12182921

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