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Open AccessArticle

Human-Induced and Climate-Driven Contributions to Water Storage Variations in the Haihe River Basin, China

1
School of Geography and Information Engineering, China University of Geosciences (Wuhan), Wuhan 430078, China
2
State Key Laboratory of Geodesy and Earth’s Dynamics, Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics, Innovation Academy for Precision Measurement Science and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430077, China
3
Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
4
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(24), 3050; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11243050
Received: 19 November 2019 / Revised: 11 December 2019 / Accepted: 13 December 2019 / Published: 17 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Remote Sensing of the Water Cycle)
Terrestrial water storage (TWS) can be influenced by both climate change and anthropogenic activities. While the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites have provided a global view on long-term trends in TWS, our ability to disentangle human impacts from natural climate variability remains limited. Here we present a quantitative method to isolate these two contributions with reconstructed climate-driven TWS anomalies (TWSA) based on long-term precipitation data. Using the Haihe River Basin (HRB) as a case study, we find a higher human-induced water depletion rate (−12.87 ± 1.07 mm/yr) compared to the original negative trend observed by GRACE alone for the period of 2003–2013, accounting for a positive climate-driven TWSA trend (+4.31 ± 0.72 mm/yr). We show that previous approaches (e.g., relying on land surface models) provide lower estimates of the climate-driven trend, and thus likely underestimated the human-induced trend. The isolation method presented in this study will help to interpret observed long-term TWS changes and assess regional anthropogenic impacts on water resources. View Full-Text
Keywords: GRACE; climate-driven; human-induced; water storage variations; Haihe River Basin GRACE; climate-driven; human-induced; water storage variations; Haihe River Basin
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zhong, Y.; Feng, W.; Humphrey, V.; Zhong, M. Human-Induced and Climate-Driven Contributions to Water Storage Variations in the Haihe River Basin, China. Remote Sens. 2019, 11, 3050.

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