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Open AccessReview

Satellite Earth Observation Data in Epidemiological Modeling of Malaria, Dengue and West Nile Virus: A Scoping Review

1
Institute for Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, 15236 Athens, Greece
2
Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Thessaly, 41500 Larissa, Greece
3
Department of Physics, University of Patras, 26504 Rio, Greece
4
Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 11527 Athens, Greece
5
Joint Research Centre (JRC), European Commission, 21027 Ispra VA, Italy
6
Department of Biometry and Epidemiology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, D-91054 Erlangen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(16), 1862; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11161862
Received: 29 May 2019 / Revised: 29 July 2019 / Accepted: 4 August 2019 / Published: 9 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing: 10th Anniversary)
Earth Observation (EO) data can be leveraged to estimate environmental variables that influence the transmission cycle of the pathogens that lead to mosquito-borne diseases (MBDs). The aim of this scoping review is to examine the state-of-the-art and identify knowledge gaps on the latest methods that used satellite EO data in their epidemiological models focusing on malaria, dengue and West Nile Virus (WNV). In total, 43 scientific papers met the inclusion criteria and were considered in this review. Researchers have examined a wide variety of methodologies ranging from statistical to machine learning algorithms. A number of studies used models and EO data that seemed promising and claimed to be easily replicated in different geographic contexts, enabling the realization of systems on regional and national scales. The need has emerged to leverage furthermore new powerful modeling approaches, like artificial intelligence and ensemble modeling and explore new and enhanced EO sensors towards the analysis of big satellite data, in order to develop accurate epidemiological models and contribute to the reduction of the burden of MBDs. View Full-Text
Keywords: mosquito-borne infectious diseases; Satellite Earth Observation data; epidemiological modeling; entomological data; vector-borne diseases; Earth Observation for health; malaria; dengue; West Nile Virus; scoping review mosquito-borne infectious diseases; Satellite Earth Observation data; epidemiological modeling; entomological data; vector-borne diseases; Earth Observation for health; malaria; dengue; West Nile Virus; scoping review
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MDPI and ACS Style

Parselia, E.; Kontoes, C.; Tsouni, A.; Hadjichristodoulou, C.; Kioutsioukis, I.; Magiorkinis, G.; Stilianakis, N.I. Satellite Earth Observation Data in Epidemiological Modeling of Malaria, Dengue and West Nile Virus: A Scoping Review. Remote Sens. 2019, 11, 1862.

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