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Article

Philopatry as a Tool to Define Tentative Closed Migration Cycles and Conservation Areas for Large Pelagic Fishes in the Pacific

Sea Around Us, Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
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Academic Editors: Stefania Chiesa, Livia Lucentini, Silvia Maltese and Alfonso Scarpato
Sustainability 2022, 14(9), 5577; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14095577
Received: 13 March 2022 / Revised: 2 May 2022 / Accepted: 2 May 2022 / Published: 6 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Life below Water: Marine Biology and Sustainable Ocean)
Migrations of large pelagic fishes across the Pacific are usually inferred from tagging or genetic studies. Even though these techniques have improved over time, they still fail to demonstrate large transoceanic migrations, usually proposing ‘routes’ that do not cycle seasonally. The current study uses the concept of ‘philopatry’ in 11 large pelagic fish species, i.e., the tendency for animals to return to their natal site to reproduce. Tentative migration routes and maps emerge by applying this concept to the movements extracted through a comprehensive review of the literature on satellite and conventional tagging, and population and subpopulation linkages inferred from genetic and/or genomic studies. Moreover, when comparing these proposed migration routes and the mapped reconstructed catch (1950–2016, Sea Around Us) of each species in the Pacific, similarities emerge, reinforcing the accuracy of these migration cycles informed by philopatry. Finally, by superposing the migration routes of our 11 species, we identified areas of the Pacific that are part of the inferred migration routes of multiple species, leading to a discussion of possible ‘blue corridors’ that would protect the studied species’ key migration routes and stocks, which are important for the fisheries, culture and nutrition of Pacific islanders. View Full-Text
Keywords: conservation priority; biodiversity; fisheries; tuna; billfish; migrations; temperature; philopatry; MPAs; high seas; blue corridors conservation priority; biodiversity; fisheries; tuna; billfish; migrations; temperature; philopatry; MPAs; high seas; blue corridors
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MDPI and ACS Style

Relano, V.; Pauly, D. Philopatry as a Tool to Define Tentative Closed Migration Cycles and Conservation Areas for Large Pelagic Fishes in the Pacific. Sustainability 2022, 14, 5577. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14095577

AMA Style

Relano V, Pauly D. Philopatry as a Tool to Define Tentative Closed Migration Cycles and Conservation Areas for Large Pelagic Fishes in the Pacific. Sustainability. 2022; 14(9):5577. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14095577

Chicago/Turabian Style

Relano, Veronica, and Daniel Pauly. 2022. "Philopatry as a Tool to Define Tentative Closed Migration Cycles and Conservation Areas for Large Pelagic Fishes in the Pacific" Sustainability 14, no. 9: 5577. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14095577

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