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Article

Travelling with a Guide Dog: Experiences of People with Vision Impairment

1
Nottingham University Business School, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG8 1BB, UK
2
Department of Marketing, Kristiania University College, 0107 Oslo, Norway
3
North Wales Business School, Wrexham Glyndwr University, Wrexham LL11 2AW, UK
4
Guide Dogs, Reading RG7 3YG, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Carmen Lizarraga
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2840; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052840
Received: 3 February 2021 / Revised: 1 March 2021 / Accepted: 3 March 2021 / Published: 5 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection Transport Inequalities, Transport Poverty and Sustainability)
There is considerable research on people with vision impairment (PwVI) in the transport, travel and tourism sectors, which highlights the significance of real-time information and consistency in services to accessibility. Based on interviews with guide dog owners in the United Kingdom, this paper contributes an additional dimension to our understanding of transport accessibility for PwVI by focusing specifically on guide dog owners’ experiences in the travel and tourism sector. A guide dog is more than a mobility tool, but a human–dog partnership that improves the quality of life for PwVI; however, it also introduces constraints related to the dog’s welfare and safety. Further, lack of understanding of guide dog owners’ rights to reasonable accommodation leads to discrimination through service refusals and challenges to service access. This paper concludes that the limited and inconsistent public knowledge of disability diversity has serious ramifications for transport accessibility and suggests specific industry and legislative interventions in response. View Full-Text
Keywords: vision impairment; guide dog; accessibility; disability; travel; transport vision impairment; guide dog; accessibility; disability; travel; transport
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rickly, J.M.; Halpern, N.; Hansen, M.; Welsman, J. Travelling with a Guide Dog: Experiences of People with Vision Impairment. Sustainability 2021, 13, 2840. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052840

AMA Style

Rickly JM, Halpern N, Hansen M, Welsman J. Travelling with a Guide Dog: Experiences of People with Vision Impairment. Sustainability. 2021; 13(5):2840. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052840

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rickly, Jillian M., Nigel Halpern, Marcus Hansen, and John Welsman. 2021. "Travelling with a Guide Dog: Experiences of People with Vision Impairment" Sustainability 13, no. 5: 2840. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052840

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