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Article

Climate-Responsive Green-Space Design Inspired by Traditional Gardens: Microclimate and Human Thermal Comfort of Japanese Gardens

1
Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan
2
FEAST Project, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Kyoto 603-8047, Japan
3
Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Mohammad A Rahman
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2736; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052736
Received: 13 February 2021 / Revised: 25 February 2021 / Accepted: 28 February 2021 / Published: 3 March 2021
Urban green spaces can provide relaxation, exercise, social interaction, and many other benefits for their communities, towns, and cities. However, green spaces in hot and humid regions risk being underutilized by residents unless thermal environments are designed to be sufficiently comfortable. Understanding what conditions are needed for comfortable outdoor spaces, particularly how people feel in regard to their thermal environment, is vital in designing spaces for public use. Traditional gardens are excellent examples of successful microclimate design from which we can learn, as they are developed over the generations through observation and modification. This study analyzed how Japanese gardens affect people’s thermal stress on extremely hot summer days. Meteorological data was collected in three Japanese gardens, and human thermal comfort was evaluated through physiological equivalent temperature (PET). Statistical analysis examined the relationship between spatial configurations of the gardens and thermal comfort. Our study revealed that Japanese gardens can efficiently ameliorate thermal stress. Spatial analysis showed that garden elements affect thermal comfort variously depending on time of the day and spatial distribution. View Full-Text
Keywords: Japanese garden; microclimate; thermal comfort; climate responsive strategy; PET; urban green-space design; human well-being; comfortable urban environment Japanese garden; microclimate; thermal comfort; climate responsive strategy; PET; urban green-space design; human well-being; comfortable urban environment
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cui, L.; Rupprecht, C.D.D.; Shibata, S. Climate-Responsive Green-Space Design Inspired by Traditional Gardens: Microclimate and Human Thermal Comfort of Japanese Gardens. Sustainability 2021, 13, 2736. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052736

AMA Style

Cui L, Rupprecht CDD, Shibata S. Climate-Responsive Green-Space Design Inspired by Traditional Gardens: Microclimate and Human Thermal Comfort of Japanese Gardens. Sustainability. 2021; 13(5):2736. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052736

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cui, Lihua, Christoph D.D. Rupprecht, and Shozo Shibata. 2021. "Climate-Responsive Green-Space Design Inspired by Traditional Gardens: Microclimate and Human Thermal Comfort of Japanese Gardens" Sustainability 13, no. 5: 2736. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052736

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