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Article

Dilemma of Geoconservation of Monogenetic Volcanic Sites under Fast Urbanization and Infrastructure Developments with Special Relevance to the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

1
School of Agriculture and Environment, Massey University, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
2
Institute of Earth Physics and Space Science, 9400 Sopron, Hungary
3
The Geoconservation Trust Aotearoa, 52 Hukutaia Road, Ōpōtiki 3122, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Francesco Faccini
Sustainability 2021, 13(12), 6549; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126549
Received: 5 May 2021 / Revised: 6 June 2021 / Accepted: 7 June 2021 / Published: 8 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Disaster Risk Reduction)
Geoheritage is an important aspect in developing workable strategies for natural hazard resilience. This is reflected in the UNESCO IGCP Project (# 692. Geoheritage for Geohazard Resilience) that continues to successfully develop global awareness of the multifaced aspects of geoheritage research. Geohazards form a great variety of natural phenomena that should be properly identified, and their importance communicated to all levels of society. This is especially the case in urban areas such as Auckland. The largest socio-economic urban center in New Zealand, Auckland faces potential volcanic hazards as it sits on an active Quaternary monogenetic volcanic field. Individual volcanic geosites of young eruptive products are considered to form the foundation of community outreach demonstrating causes and consequences of volcanism associated volcanism. However, in recent decades, rapid urban development has increased demand for raw materials and encroached on natural sites which would be ideal for such outreach. The dramatic loss of volcanic geoheritage of Auckland is alarming. Here we demonstrate that abandoned quarry sites (e.g., Wiri Mountain) could be used as key locations to serve these goals. We contrast the reality that Auckland sites are underutilized and fast diminishing, with positive examples known from similar but older volcanic regions, such as the Mio/Pliocene Bakony–Balaton UNESCO Global Geopark in Hungary. View Full-Text
Keywords: geoheritage; geoconservation; geohazard; resilience; quarry; urban expansion; geodiversity; scoria cone; tuff ring; base surge geoheritage; geoconservation; geohazard; resilience; quarry; urban expansion; geodiversity; scoria cone; tuff ring; base surge
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MDPI and ACS Style

Németh, K.; Gravis, I.; Németh, B. Dilemma of Geoconservation of Monogenetic Volcanic Sites under Fast Urbanization and Infrastructure Developments with Special Relevance to the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand. Sustainability 2021, 13, 6549. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126549

AMA Style

Németh K, Gravis I, Németh B. Dilemma of Geoconservation of Monogenetic Volcanic Sites under Fast Urbanization and Infrastructure Developments with Special Relevance to the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand. Sustainability. 2021; 13(12):6549. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126549

Chicago/Turabian Style

Németh, Károly, Ilmars Gravis, and Boglárka Németh. 2021. "Dilemma of Geoconservation of Monogenetic Volcanic Sites under Fast Urbanization and Infrastructure Developments with Special Relevance to the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand" Sustainability 13, no. 12: 6549. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126549

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