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Open AccessArticle

Housing Choices of Older People: Staying or Moving in the Case of High Care Needs

1
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Ljubljana, Kardeljeva ploščad 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
2
Urban Planning Institute of the Republic of Slovenia, Trnovski pristan 2, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2888; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072888
Received: 10 January 2020 / Revised: 27 March 2020 / Accepted: 28 March 2020 / Published: 4 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A Healthy Built Environment for an Ageing Population)
Despite the development of various housing options across Europe, older people often face the choice of staying at home with the support of family and/or formal services or moving to a care home, but how people vary regarding these preferences and how newer cohorts will be different is under-researched. This study explores the housing choices of older people under the condition of liminality, which is defined as the hypothetical condition of high care needs. The most common choices available are compared; that is, staying at home (with social home-care support or visits to a daycare centre) or moving to supported housing or a care home. Cluster analysis revealed five distinct groups of older people that were differentiated in their choices between various options of moving versus staying at home, either by using home care or daycare. Differences between the clusters along three dimensions that influence decisions to move or stay, namely levels of attachment, satisfaction with housing and availability of support, which often function as limits on the options that are preferred, were explored. The results present the complexity of the decision-making process under imagined conditions of liminality and show a great diversity among people’s preferences. They also indicate that a significant share of older people have a strong preference for only one option (two of the cluster groups). View Full-Text
Keywords: older people; housing choices; liminality; place attachment; satisfaction; social support older people; housing choices; liminality; place attachment; satisfaction; social support
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MDPI and ACS Style

Filipovič Hrast, M.; Sendi, R.; Kerbler, B. Housing Choices of Older People: Staying or Moving in the Case of High Care Needs. Sustainability 2020, 12, 2888. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072888

AMA Style

Filipovič Hrast M, Sendi R, Kerbler B. Housing Choices of Older People: Staying or Moving in the Case of High Care Needs. Sustainability. 2020; 12(7):2888. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072888

Chicago/Turabian Style

Filipovič Hrast, Maša; Sendi, Richard; Kerbler, Boštjan. 2020. "Housing Choices of Older People: Staying or Moving in the Case of High Care Needs" Sustainability 12, no. 7: 2888. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072888

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