Next Article in Journal
Assessing the Efficiency of Sustainable Cities Using an Empirical Approach
Previous Article in Journal
South African National Climate Change Response Policy Sensitization: An Assessment of Smallholder Farmers in Amathole District Municipality, Eastern Cape Province
Previous Article in Special Issue
Energy Intensity and Human Mobility after the Anthropocene
Open AccessArticle

Domination, Power, Supremacy: Confronting Anthropolitics with Ecological Realism

1
Department of Economics and Management, University of Helsinki, 00500 Helsinki, Finland
2
Department of Marketing, Hanken School of Economics, 00100 Helsinki, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2617; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072617
Received: 21 January 2020 / Revised: 19 March 2020 / Accepted: 24 March 2020 / Published: 26 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue After the An­thro­po­cene: Time and Mo­bil­ity)
In this article, we study politics as domination. From our point of view, domination, especially in the Anthropocene, has had two vital components—power and supremacy. In order to dominate, one has to have power over others. In addition, the politics of domination, such as colonial oppression of Latin America, has required reasoning, justification, and legitimation, often connected to superiority (because of religion, society, or civilization) from the oppressor’s end. Past and present political ideologies and programs, such as colonialism, imperialism, but also welfare state capitalism, neoliberalism and increasingly popular Green New Deal are examples of what we call “anthropolitics”, an anthropocentric approach to politics based on domination, power, and supremacist exploitation. In contrast to the prevailing anthropolitics, this article discusses post-Anthropocene politics, characterized by localization and decentralization, as well as a steep reduction of matter–energy throughput by introducing a theoretical frame called ecological realism. View Full-Text
Keywords: anthropocentrism; Anthropocene; deep ecology; degrowth; domination; ecological realism; politics; post-Anthropocene; power; supremacy anthropocentrism; Anthropocene; deep ecology; degrowth; domination; ecological realism; politics; post-Anthropocene; power; supremacy
MDPI and ACS Style

Ruuska, T.; Heikkurinen, P.; Wilén, K. Domination, Power, Supremacy: Confronting Anthropolitics with Ecological Realism. Sustainability 2020, 12, 2617.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop