Next Article in Journal
Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of Mediterranean Sea Bass and Sea Bream
Next Article in Special Issue
Risk Perceptions and Flood Insurance: Insights from Homeowners on the Georgia Coast
Previous Article in Journal
Examining the Relationship between Hukou Status, Perceived Neighborhood Conditions, and Fear of Crime in Guangzhou, China
Previous Article in Special Issue
Dark Clouds over the Silk Road: Challenges Facing Mountain Environments in Central Asia
Article

Analyzing Coping Strategies and Adaptation after Resettlement—Case Study of Ekondo Kondo, Cameroon and Ekondo Kondo Model of Adaptation

International Center for Ethics in the Sciences and Humanities (IZEW), University of Tübingen, Wilhelmstr. 19, 72074 Tübingen, Germany
Sustainability 2020, 12(22), 9615; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229615
Received: 27 August 2020 / Revised: 13 November 2020 / Accepted: 17 November 2020 / Published: 18 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Catastrophes)
This article centrally deals with the resettlement of the Cameroonian village Ekondo Kondo. In the following paper, I present resettlements as catastrophic events for the relocated populations. Research was conducted in the resettled Cameroonian village of Ekondo Kondo. The objectives of the research were to find out what kind of changes and challenges (positive and negative) people faced after relocation, whether these changes and challenges illustrated aspects of adaptation after resettlement which are lacking in the literature, and whether they could be included in the existing models of adaptation after resettlement to provide an enhanced framework for resettlement-linked projects. I demonstrate the consequences of the relocation for women and men. Whereas women developed coping strategies, adapted to the new village (site) 13 years after the relocation, and were able to emancipate themselves, men are still struggling with the relocation’s changes including threats to their former social role as hunters. These results support my argument that the existing adaptation models in the literature do not depict all key challenges the relocated populations have to go through. According to the fieldwork results, there are several adaptation processes in different key areas which do not follow one another or run homogenously but overlap and sometimes happen at the same time and on different levels. Additionally, there are significant gender specific differences which can be depicted in these key areas. Further predispositions of social groups, such as interests or experiences, can influence the processes of coping and adaptation as well. For this reason, I present and introduce the Ekondo Kondo Model of adaptation after relocation, which can be helpful both for difficult adaptation following disasters and adaptation processes when people develop fast coping strategies and get positive results. View Full-Text
Keywords: relocation; catastrophic event; coping; rehabilitation; empowerment; adaptation model; Ekondo Kondo model relocation; catastrophic event; coping; rehabilitation; empowerment; adaptation model; Ekondo Kondo model
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Schopp, K. Analyzing Coping Strategies and Adaptation after Resettlement—Case Study of Ekondo Kondo, Cameroon and Ekondo Kondo Model of Adaptation. Sustainability 2020, 12, 9615. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229615

AMA Style

Schopp K. Analyzing Coping Strategies and Adaptation after Resettlement—Case Study of Ekondo Kondo, Cameroon and Ekondo Kondo Model of Adaptation. Sustainability. 2020; 12(22):9615. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229615

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schopp, Kerstin. 2020. "Analyzing Coping Strategies and Adaptation after Resettlement—Case Study of Ekondo Kondo, Cameroon and Ekondo Kondo Model of Adaptation" Sustainability 12, no. 22: 9615. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229615

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop