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Review

Urban Horticulture for Food Secure Cities through and beyond COVID-19

1
Department Plant Sciences, College of Agriculture and Marine Science, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 34, Al-khod 123, Oman
2
Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Faisalabad 38000, Pakistan
3
Department of Engineering School of Sustainable Design Engineering, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A4P3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(22), 9592; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229592
Received: 20 October 2020 / Revised: 6 November 2020 / Accepted: 13 November 2020 / Published: 18 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Post-COVID-19 Agriculture and Food Security)
Sufficient production, consistent food supply, and environmental protection in urban +settings are major global concerns for future sustainable cities. Currently, sustainable food supply is under intense pressure due to exponential population growth, expanding urban dwellings, climate change, and limited natural resources. The recent novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic crisis has impacted sustainable fresh food supply, and has disrupted the food supply chain and prices significantly. Under these circumstances, urban horticulture and crop cultivation have emerged as potential ways to expand to new locations through urban green infrastructure. Therefore, the objective of this study is to review the salient features of contemporary urban horticulture, in addition to illustrating traditional and innovative developments occurring in urban environments. Current urban cropping systems, such as home gardening, community gardens, edible landscape, and indoor planting systems, can be enhanced with new techniques, such as vertical gardening, hydroponics, aeroponics, aquaponics, and rooftop gardening. These modern techniques are ecofriendly, energy- saving, and promise food security through steady supplies of fresh fruits and vegetables to urban neighborhoods. There is a need, in this modern era, to integrate information technology tools in urban horticulture, which could help in maintaining consistent food supply during (and after) a pandemic, as well as make agriculture more sustainable. View Full-Text
Keywords: cropping systems; ecological sustainability; hygienic food; sustainable food supply; urban horticulture cropping systems; ecological sustainability; hygienic food; sustainable food supply; urban horticulture
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MDPI and ACS Style

Khan, M.M.; Akram, M.T.; Janke, R.; Qadri, R.W.K.; Al-Sadi, A.M.; Farooque, A.A. Urban Horticulture for Food Secure Cities through and beyond COVID-19. Sustainability 2020, 12, 9592. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229592

AMA Style

Khan MM, Akram MT, Janke R, Qadri RWK, Al-Sadi AM, Farooque AA. Urban Horticulture for Food Secure Cities through and beyond COVID-19. Sustainability. 2020; 12(22):9592. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229592

Chicago/Turabian Style

Khan, Muhammad M., Muhammad T. Akram, Rhonda Janke, Rashad W.K. Qadri, Abdullah M. Al-Sadi, and Aitazaz A. Farooque. 2020. "Urban Horticulture for Food Secure Cities through and beyond COVID-19" Sustainability 12, no. 22: 9592. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229592

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