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Open AccessArticle

Higher Levels of Physical Fitness Are Associated with Lower Peak Plantar Pressures in Older Women

1
Department of General and Applied Kinesiology, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Zagreb, 10 000 Zagreb, Croatia
2
Department of Sport Motorics and Methodology in Kinanthropology, Faculty of Sports Studies, Masaryk University, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic
3
Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(10), 4119; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12104119
Received: 8 April 2020 / Revised: 15 May 2020 / Accepted: 16 May 2020 / Published: 18 May 2020
Little is known about how physical fitness is associated with peak plantar pressures in older adults. Therefore, the main purpose of the study was to explore whether higher physical fitness levels were associated with lower peak plantar pressures in a sample of community-dwelling older adults. In this cross-sectional study, we recruited 120 older women aged ≥60 years. To assess the level of peak plantar pressure, we used a Zebris plantar pressure platform. To estimate the level of physical fitness, a senior fitness test battery was used. To calculate the associations between the level of physical fitness and peak plantar pressures beneath the different foot regions (forefoot, midfoot and hindfoot), we used generalized estimating equations with a linear regression model. In unadjusted models, higher physical fitness levels were associated with lower peak plantar pressures. When we adjusted for chronological age, the risk of falls and the presence of foot pain, higher physical fitness levels remained associated with lower peak plantar pressures. Our study shows that higher levels of physical fitness are associated with lower peak plantar pressures, even after adjusting for several potential covariates. View Full-Text
Keywords: older adults; exercise; correlation; foot; biomechanics older adults; exercise; correlation; foot; biomechanics
MDPI and ACS Style

Štefan, L.; Kasović, M.; Zvonař, M. Higher Levels of Physical Fitness Are Associated with Lower Peak Plantar Pressures in Older Women. Sustainability 2020, 12, 4119.

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