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Article

Contextualization of Archaeological Information Using Augmented Photospheres, Viewed with Head-Mounted Displays

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ARTEHIS, UMR 6298 CNRS, Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 21000 Dijon, France
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Biogéosciences, UMR CNRS EPHE 6282, Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 21000 Dijon, France
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EPHE, PSL University, 75014 Paris, France
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Musée d’Anthropologie Préhistorique de Monaco, MC 98000, Monaco
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Archéologies Sciences de l’Antiquité, UMR 7041 CNRS Université de Paris 1, 92023 Nanterre, France
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Department of Archaeology, University of Hradec Králové, 50003 Hradec Králové, Czech Republic
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Khakassian Research Institute of Language, Literature and History, 655017 Abakan, Russia
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UFR SVTE, Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 21000 Dijon, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(14), 3894; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11143894
Received: 19 May 2019 / Revised: 25 June 2019 / Accepted: 8 July 2019 / Published: 17 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computational Approaches to the Sustainability of Cultural Heritage)
Photospheres, or 360° photos, offer valuable opportunities for perceiving space, especially when viewed through head-mounted displays designed for virtual reality. Here, we propose to take advantage of this potential for archaeology and cultural heritage, and to extend it by augmenting the images with existing documentation, such as 2D maps or 3D models, resulting from research studies. Photospheres are generally produced in the form of distorted equirectangular projections, neither georeferenced nor oriented, so that any registration of external documentation is far from straightforward. The present paper seeks to fill this gap by providing simple practical solutions, based on rigid and non-rigid transformations. Immersive virtual environments augmented by research materials can be very useful to contextualize archaeological discoveries, and to test research hypotheses, especially when the team is back at the laboratory. Colleagues and the general public can also be transported to the site, almost physically, generating an authentic sense of presence, which greatly facilitates the contextualization of the archaeological information gathered. This is especially true with head-mounted displays, but the resulting images can also be inspected using applications designed for the web, or viewers for smartphones, tablets and computers. View Full-Text
Keywords: virtual reality; archaeology; scientific mediation; visualization; cultural heritage; registration; thin-plate spline; Procrustes; projection; computer graphics virtual reality; archaeology; scientific mediation; visualization; cultural heritage; registration; thin-plate spline; Procrustes; projection; computer graphics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Monna, F.; Navarro, N.; Magail, J.; Guillon, R.; Rolland, T.; Wilczek, J.; Esin, Y.; Chateau, C. Contextualization of Archaeological Information Using Augmented Photospheres, Viewed with Head-Mounted Displays. Sustainability 2019, 11, 3894. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11143894

AMA Style

Monna F, Navarro N, Magail J, Guillon R, Rolland T, Wilczek J, Esin Y, Chateau C. Contextualization of Archaeological Information Using Augmented Photospheres, Viewed with Head-Mounted Displays. Sustainability. 2019; 11(14):3894. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11143894

Chicago/Turabian Style

Monna, Fabrice, Nicolas Navarro, Jérôme Magail, Rodrigue Guillon, Tanguy Rolland, Josef Wilczek, Yury Esin, and Carmela Chateau. 2019. "Contextualization of Archaeological Information Using Augmented Photospheres, Viewed with Head-Mounted Displays" Sustainability 11, no. 14: 3894. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11143894

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