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Open AccessArticle

Sustainable Production of Sweet Sorghum as a Bioenergy Crop Using Biosolids Taking into Account Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Institute of Agroecology and Plant Production, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences 24a Grunwaldzki Square, 50-363 Wrocław, Poland
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Sustainability 2019, 11(11), 3033; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11113033
Received: 14 April 2019 / Revised: 19 May 2019 / Accepted: 24 May 2019 / Published: 29 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Warming, Environmental Governance and Sustainability Issues)
Currently, little data are available on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from sweet sorghum production under temperate climate. Similarly, information on the effect of bio-based waste products use on the carbon (C) footprint of sorghum cultivation is rare in the literature. The aim of this study was to evaluate the agronomical and environmental effects of the application of biosolids as a nitrogen source in the production of sweet sorghum as a bioenergy crop. The yield of sorghum biomass was assessed and the GHG emissions arising from crop production were quantified. The present study focused on whether agricultural use of sewage sludge and digestate could be considered an option to improve the C footprint of sorghum production. Biosolids—sewage sludge and digestate—could be recognized as a nutrient substitute without crop yield losses. Nitrogen application had the greatest impact on the external GHG emissions and it was responsible for 54% of these emissions. CO2eq emissions decreased by 14 and 11%, respectively, when sewage sludge and digestate were applied. This fertilization practice represents a promising strategy for low C agriculture and could be recommended to provide sustainable sorghum production as a bioenergy crop to mitigate GHG emissions. View Full-Text
Keywords: GHG emissions; carbon footprint; sweet sorghum; fertilization management; digestate; sewage sludge GHG emissions; carbon footprint; sweet sorghum; fertilization management; digestate; sewage sludge
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MDPI and ACS Style

Głąb, L.; Sowiński, J. Sustainable Production of Sweet Sorghum as a Bioenergy Crop Using Biosolids Taking into Account Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Sustainability 2019, 11, 3033. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11113033

AMA Style

Głąb L, Sowiński J. Sustainable Production of Sweet Sorghum as a Bioenergy Crop Using Biosolids Taking into Account Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Sustainability. 2019; 11(11):3033. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11113033

Chicago/Turabian Style

Głąb, Lilianna; Sowiński, Józef. 2019. "Sustainable Production of Sweet Sorghum as a Bioenergy Crop Using Biosolids Taking into Account Greenhouse Gas Emissions" Sustainability 11, no. 11: 3033. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11113033

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