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Building Ownership, Renovation Investments, and Energy Performance—A Study of Multi-Family Dwellings in Gothenburg

1
City Development, Research Institutes of Sweden, 41261 Gothenburg, Sweden
2
Architecture and Civil Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Gothenburg, Sweden
3
Department of Business Administration, University of Gothenburg, 40530 Gothenburg, Sweden
4
Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, 97187 Luleå, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1684; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051684
Received: 28 March 2018 / Revised: 28 April 2018 / Accepted: 17 May 2018 / Published: 22 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Built Environment and Urban Growth Management)
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Abstract

The European building stock was renewed at a rapid pace during the period 1950–1975. In many European countries, the building stock from this time needs to be renovated, and there are opportunities to introduce energy efficiency measures in the renovation process. Information availability and increasingly available analysis tools make it possible to assess the impact of policy and regulation. This article describes methods developed for analyzing investments in renovation and energy performance based on building ownership and inhabitant socio-economic information developed for Swedish authorities, to be used for the Swedish national renovations strategy in 2019. This was done by analyzing measured energy usage and renovation investments made during the last 30 years, coupled with building specific official information of buildings and resident area characteristics, for multi-family dwellings in Gothenburg (N = 6319). The statistical analyses show that more costly renovations lead to decreasing energy usage for heating, but buildings that have been renovated during the last decades have a higher energy usage when accounting for current heating system, ownership, and resident socio-economic background. It is appropriate to include an affordability aspect in larger renovation projects since economically disadvantaged groups are over-represented in buildings with poorer energy performance. View Full-Text
Keywords: renovation extent; energy retrofitting; rent affordability; tenure; energy performance certificate; decision support renovation extent; energy retrofitting; rent affordability; tenure; energy performance certificate; decision support
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Mangold, M.; Österbring, M.; Overland, C.; Johansson, T.; Wallbaum, H. Building Ownership, Renovation Investments, and Energy Performance—A Study of Multi-Family Dwellings in Gothenburg. Sustainability 2018, 10, 1684.

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