Next Article in Journal
Optimization of the Separation Efficiency of Buckwheat Seeds and Wild Radish Siliques in a Grader with Indented Pockets
Next Article in Special Issue
Distant Interactions, Power, and Environmental Justice in Protected Area Governance: A Telecoupling Perspective
Previous Article in Journal
A Predictive Environmental Assessment Method for Construction Operations: Application to a Northeast China Case Study
Previous Article in Special Issue
Whose Agency Counts in Land Use Decision-Making in Myanmar? A Comparative Analysis of Three Cases in Tanintharyi Region
Open AccessArticle

Barking Up the Right Tree? NGOs and Corporate Power for Deforestation-Free Supply Chains

1
Department of Political Science, University of Freiburg, 79085 Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany
2
Chair Group of Sustainability Governance, University of Freiburg, 79085 Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 3869; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10113869
Received: 30 July 2018 / Revised: 19 October 2018 / Accepted: 22 October 2018 / Published: 24 October 2018
Supply chain sustainability has become a key issue for multinational corporations (MNCs). Hundreds of MNCs in agri-commodity sectors have recently committed to eliminate deforestation from their supply chains. In this article, we examine the power of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) participating in two initiatives that support the implementation of such commitments: the Accountability Framework initiative (AFi) and Transparency for Sustainable Economies (Trase). Drawing on document and literature research, participant observation as well as semi-structured interviews, we find that these NGOs exercise power with MNCs, in particular in terms of raising awareness and changing corporate self-perceptions. At the same time, though, there is a bias towards representing the positions and interests of materially strong actors in global supply chains. In doing so, NGOs risk reinforcing MNCs’ power over more marginalized actors. In this light, we argue that initiatives such as AFi and Trase can only be a first step towards a new economic system that respects ecological limits and delivers social justice. In order to shape transformative change, NGOs need to more actively push discussions about equitable distribution, emancipation and justice in natural resource governance. View Full-Text
Keywords: deforestation; deforestation-free supply chains; forest risk commodities; MNCs; NGOs; power asymmetries; power with; power over deforestation; deforestation-free supply chains; forest risk commodities; MNCs; NGOs; power asymmetries; power with; power over
MDPI and ACS Style

Weber, A.-K.; Partzsch, L. Barking Up the Right Tree? NGOs and Corporate Power for Deforestation-Free Supply Chains. Sustainability 2018, 10, 3869.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop