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Article

Do Microplastics Enter Our Food Chain Via Root Vegetables? A Raman Based Spectroscopic Study on Raphanus sativus

1
Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Foundation for Research and Technology–Hellas, N. Plastira 100, GR-70013 Heraklion, Greece
2
Department of Biology, University of Crete, N. Plastira 100, GR-70013 Heraklion, Greece
3
Department of Plant Biology, Uppsala BioCenter, Linnean Center for Plant Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7080, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden
4
Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology–Hellas, N. Plastira 100, GR-70013 Heraklion, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Carlo Maria Carbonaro
Materials 2021, 14(9), 2329; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14092329
Received: 5 April 2021 / Revised: 22 April 2021 / Accepted: 26 April 2021 / Published: 30 April 2021
The outburst of plastic pollution in terrestrial ecosystems poses a potential threat to agriculture and food safety. Studies have already provided evidence for the uptake of plastic microparticles by several plant species, accompanied by numerous developmental effects, using fluorescence labelling techniques. Here, we introduce the implementation of confocal Raman spectroscopy, a label-free method, for the effective detection of microplastics (MPs) accumulation in the roots of a common edible root vegetable plant, Raphanus sativus, after treatment with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) powder. We also demonstrate the concomitant occurrence of phenotypic defects in the polymer-treated plants. We anticipate that this work can provide new insights not only into the extent of the impact this widespread phenomenon has on crop plants but also on the methodological requirements to address it. View Full-Text
Keywords: label-free; microscopy; detection; plastic; pollution; environment; edible; crop plants; ABS label-free; microscopy; detection; plastic; pollution; environment; edible; crop plants; ABS
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tympa, L.-E.; Katsara, K.; Moschou, P.N.; Kenanakis, G.; Papadakis, V.M. Do Microplastics Enter Our Food Chain Via Root Vegetables? A Raman Based Spectroscopic Study on Raphanus sativus. Materials 2021, 14, 2329. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14092329

AMA Style

Tympa L-E, Katsara K, Moschou PN, Kenanakis G, Papadakis VM. Do Microplastics Enter Our Food Chain Via Root Vegetables? A Raman Based Spectroscopic Study on Raphanus sativus. Materials. 2021; 14(9):2329. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14092329

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tympa, Leda-Eleni, Klytaimnistra Katsara, Panagiotis N. Moschou, George Kenanakis, and Vassilis M. Papadakis 2021. "Do Microplastics Enter Our Food Chain Via Root Vegetables? A Raman Based Spectroscopic Study on Raphanus sativus" Materials 14, no. 9: 2329. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14092329

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