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Open AccessArticle

Bacterial Cellulose-Modified Polyhydroxyalkanoates Scaffolds Promotes Bone Formation in Critical Size Calvarial Defects in Mice

1
Faculty of Medicine, Vasile Goldis Western University of Arad, 94–96 Revolutiei Avenue, 310025 Arad, Romania
2
“Aurel Ardelean” Institute of Life Sciences, Vasile Goldis Western University of Arad, 86 Rebreanu Street, 310414 Arad, Romania
3
Advanced Polymer Materials Group, University Politehnica of Bucharest, 060042 Bucharest, Romania
4
Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, University Politehnica of Bucharest, 060042 Bucharest, Romania
5
Department of Oxide Materials Science & Engineering, University Politehnica of Bucharest, 011061 Bucharest, Romania
6
Department of Anatomy, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Carol Davila, 050471 Bucharest, Romania
7
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Bucharest, 050471 Bucharest, Romania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Authors with equal contribution.
Materials 2020, 13(6), 1433; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13061433
Received: 5 February 2020 / Revised: 11 March 2020 / Accepted: 16 March 2020 / Published: 21 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanosciences Applied in Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery)
Bone regeneration is a claim challenge in addressing bone defects with large tissue deficits, that involves bone grafts to support the activity. In vitro biocompatibility of the bacterial cellulose-modified polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHB/BC) scaffolds and its osteogenic potential in critical-size mouse calvaria defects had been investigated. Bone promotion and mineralization were analyzed by biochemistry, histology/histomorphometry, X-ray analysis and immunofluorescence for highlighting osteogenesis markers. In summary, our results showed that PHB/BC scaffolds are able to support 3T3-L1 preadipocytes proliferation and had a positive effect on in vivo osteoblast differentiation, consequently inducing new bone formation after 20 weeks post-implantation. Thus, the newly developed PHB/BC scaffolds could turn out to be suitable biomaterials for the bone tissue engineering purpose. View Full-Text
Keywords: bacterial cellulose; polyhydroxyalkanoates; bone tissue engineering; in vivo tests bacterial cellulose; polyhydroxyalkanoates; bone tissue engineering; in vivo tests
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MDPI and ACS Style

Codreanu, A.; Balta, C.; Herman, H.; Cotoraci, C.; Mihali, C.V.; Zurbau, N.; Zaharia, C.; Rapa, M.; Stanescu, P.; Radu, I.-C.; Vasile, E.; Lupu, G.; Galateanu, B.; Hermenean, A. Bacterial Cellulose-Modified Polyhydroxyalkanoates Scaffolds Promotes Bone Formation in Critical Size Calvarial Defects in Mice. Materials 2020, 13, 1433.

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