Next Article in Journal
Multiscale Material Characterization Based on Single Particle Impact Utilizing Particle-Oriented Peening and Single-Impact Peening
Next Article in Special Issue
Effect of the Pore Shape and Size of 3D-Printed Open-Porous ABS Materials on Sound Absorption Performance
Previous Article in Journal
SbSI Composites Based on Epoxy Resin and Cellulose for Energy Harvesting and Sensors—The Influence of SBSI Nanowires Conglomeration on Piezoelectric Properties
Previous Article in Special Issue
Four Questions in Cellular Material Design
Article

Improving the Mechanical Strength of Dental Applications and Lattice Structures SLM Processed

1
Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 400641 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
2
Institute for Toolless Fabrication, 52074 Aachen, Germany
3
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronics, FH Aachen University of Applied Sciences, 52064 Aachen, Germany
4
Loughborough Design School, University Loughborough, Loughborough LE11 3TU, Leics, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2020, 13(4), 905; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13040905
Received: 21 January 2020 / Revised: 10 February 2020 / Accepted: 15 February 2020 / Published: 18 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Cellular Materials)
To manufacture custom medical parts or scaffolds with reduced defects and high mechanical characteristics, new research on optimizing the selective laser melting (SLM) parameters are needed. In this work, a biocompatible powder, 316L stainless steel, is characterized to understand the particle size, distribution, shape and flowability. Examination revealed that the 316L particles are smooth, nearly spherical, their mean diameter is 39.09 μm and just 10% of them hold a diameter less than 21.18 μm. SLM parameters under consideration include laser power up to 200 W, 250–1500 mm/s scanning speed, 80 μm hatch spacing, 35 μm layer thickness and a preheated platform. The effect of these on processability is evaluated. More than 100 samples are SLM-manufactured with different process parameters. The tensile results show that is possible to raise the ultimate tensile strength up to 840 MPa, adapting the SLM parameters for a stable processability, avoiding the technological defects caused by residual stress. Correlating with other recent studies on SLM technology, the tensile strength is 20% improved. To validate the SLM parameters and conditions established, complex bioengineering applications such as dental bridges and macro-porous grafts are SLM-processed, demonstrating the potential to manufacture medical products with increased mechanical resistance made of 316L. View Full-Text
Keywords: stainless steel; particle size; particle shape; process parameters; processability index; tensile strength stainless steel; particle size; particle shape; process parameters; processability index; tensile strength
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Cosma, C.; Kessler, J.; Gebhardt, A.; Campbell, I.; Balc, N. Improving the Mechanical Strength of Dental Applications and Lattice Structures SLM Processed. Materials 2020, 13, 905. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13040905

AMA Style

Cosma C, Kessler J, Gebhardt A, Campbell I, Balc N. Improving the Mechanical Strength of Dental Applications and Lattice Structures SLM Processed. Materials. 2020; 13(4):905. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13040905

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cosma, Cosmin, Julia Kessler, Andreas Gebhardt, Ian Campbell, and Nicolae Balc. 2020. "Improving the Mechanical Strength of Dental Applications and Lattice Structures SLM Processed" Materials 13, no. 4: 905. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13040905

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop