Next Article in Journal
Ultralight Industrial Bamboo Residue-Derived Holocellulose Thermal Insulation Aerogels with Hydrophobic and Fire Resistant Properties
Previous Article in Journal
Degradation and Biocompatibility of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Implants In Vitro and In Vivo: A Micro-Computed Tomography Study in Rats
 
 
Article

Effect of Zr Content on Phase Stability, Deformation Behavior, and Young’s Modulus in Ti–Nb–Zr Alloys

by 1, 1,2,* and 2,3,4,*
1
Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573, Japan
2
Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573, Japan
3
Foundation for Advancement of International Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0821, Japan
4
Center of Advanced Innovation Technologies-VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 708 00 Ostrava-Poruba, Czech Republic
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2020, 13(2), 476; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13020476
Received: 29 November 2019 / Revised: 8 January 2020 / Accepted: 14 January 2020 / Published: 19 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Biomaterials)
Ti alloys have attracted continuing research attention as promising biomaterials due to their superior corrosion resistance and biocompatibility and excellent mechanical properties. Metastable β-type Ti alloys also provide several unique properties such as low Young’s modulus, shape memory effect, and superelasticity. Such unique properties are predominantly attributed to the phase stability and reversible martensitic transformation. In this study, the effects of the Nb and Zr contents on phase constitution, transformation temperature, deformation behavior, and Young’s modulus were investigated. Ti–Nb and Ti–Nb–Zr alloys over a wide composition range, i.e., Ti–(18–40)Nb, Ti–(15–40)Nb–4Zr, Ti–(16–40)Nb–8Zr, Ti–(15–40)Nb–12Zr, Ti–(12–17)Nb–18Zr, were fabricated and their properties were characterized. The phase boundary between the β phase and the α′′ martensite phase was clarified. The lower limit content of Nb to suppress the martensitic transformation and to obtain a single β phase at room temperature decreased with increasing Zr content. The Ti–25Nb, Ti–22Nb–4Zr, Ti–19Nb–8Zr, Ti–17Nb–12Zr and Ti–14Nb–18Zr alloys exhibit the lowest Young’s modulus among Ti–Nb–Zr alloys with Zr content of 0, 4, 8, 12, and 18 at.%, respectively. Particularly, the Ti–14Nb–18Zr alloy exhibits a very low Young’s modulus less than 40 GPa. Correlation among alloy composition, phase stability, and Young’s modulus was discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ti alloys; Young’s modulus; martensitic transformation; shape memory effect; superelasticity Ti alloys; Young’s modulus; martensitic transformation; shape memory effect; superelasticity
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, K.M.; Kim, H.Y.; Miyazaki, S. Effect of Zr Content on Phase Stability, Deformation Behavior, and Young’s Modulus in Ti–Nb–Zr Alloys. Materials 2020, 13, 476. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13020476

AMA Style

Kim KM, Kim HY, Miyazaki S. Effect of Zr Content on Phase Stability, Deformation Behavior, and Young’s Modulus in Ti–Nb–Zr Alloys. Materials. 2020; 13(2):476. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13020476

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Kyong Min, Hee Young Kim, and Shuichi Miyazaki. 2020. "Effect of Zr Content on Phase Stability, Deformation Behavior, and Young’s Modulus in Ti–Nb–Zr Alloys" Materials 13, no. 2: 476. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13020476

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop