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Article

Understanding the Detection Mechanisms and Ability of Molecular Hydrogen on Three-Dimensional Bicontinuous Nanoporous Reduced Graphene Oxide

1
Institute of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8571, Japan
2
Research Center for Computational Design of Advanced Functional Materials, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568, Japan
3
Center for Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8577, Japan
4
Department of Applied Science, Okayama University of Science, Okayama 700-0005, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2020, 13(10), 2259; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13102259
Received: 1 April 2020 / Revised: 7 May 2020 / Accepted: 12 May 2020 / Published: 14 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Applications of Nanoporous Materials)
Environmental safety has become increasingly important with respect to hydrogen use in society. Monitoring techniques for explosive gaseous hydrogen are essential to ensure safety in sustainable hydrogen utilization. Here, we reveal molecular hydrogen detection mechanisms with monolithic three-dimensional nanoporous reduced graphene oxide under gaseous hydrogen flow and at room temperature. Nanoporous reduced graphene oxide significantly increased molecular hydrogen physisorption without the need to employ catalytic metals or heating. This can be explained by the significantly increased surface area in comparison to two-dimensional graphene sheets and conventional reduced graphene oxide flakes. Using this large surface area, molecular hydrogen adsorption behaviors were accurately observed. In particular, we found that the electrical resistance firstly decreased and then gradually increased with higher gaseous hydrogen concentrations. The resistance decrease was due to charge transfer from the molecular hydrogen to the reduced graphene oxide at adsorbed molecular hydrogen concentrations lower than 2.8 ppm; conversely, the resistance increase was a result of Coulomb scattering effects at adsorbed molecular hydrogen concentrations exceeding 5.0 ppm, as supported by density functional theory. These findings not only provide the detailed adsorption mechanisms of molecular hydrogen, but also advance the development of catalyst-free non-heated physisorption-type molecular detection devices. View Full-Text
Keywords: porous graphene; graphene oxide; hydrogen adsorption porous graphene; graphene oxide; hydrogen adsorption
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ito, Y.; Kayanuma, M.; Shigeta, Y.; Fujita, J.-i.; Tanabe, Y. Understanding the Detection Mechanisms and Ability of Molecular Hydrogen on Three-Dimensional Bicontinuous Nanoporous Reduced Graphene Oxide. Materials 2020, 13, 2259. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13102259

AMA Style

Ito Y, Kayanuma M, Shigeta Y, Fujita J-i, Tanabe Y. Understanding the Detection Mechanisms and Ability of Molecular Hydrogen on Three-Dimensional Bicontinuous Nanoporous Reduced Graphene Oxide. Materials. 2020; 13(10):2259. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13102259

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ito, Yoshikazu, Megumi Kayanuma, Yasuteru Shigeta, Jun-ichi Fujita, and Yoichi Tanabe. 2020. "Understanding the Detection Mechanisms and Ability of Molecular Hydrogen on Three-Dimensional Bicontinuous Nanoporous Reduced Graphene Oxide" Materials 13, no. 10: 2259. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13102259

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