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Article

The Martensitic Transformation and Mechanical Properties of Ti6Al4V Prepared via Selective Laser Melting

1
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063, China
2
School of aeronautical manufacturing and engineering, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063, China
3
Research School of Engineering, Australian National University, Acton, ACT 2601, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2019, 12(2), 321; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12020321
Received: 14 December 2018 / Revised: 17 January 2019 / Accepted: 18 January 2019 / Published: 21 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Additive Manufacturing: Alloy Design and Process Innovations)
This article investigated the microstructure of Ti6Al4V that was fabricated via selective laser melting; specifically, the mechanism of martensitic transformation and relationship among parent β phase, martensite (α’) and newly generated β phase that formed in the present experiments were elucidated. The primary X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and tensile test were combined to discuss the relationship between α’, β phase and mechanical properties. The average width of each coarse β columnar grain is 80–160 μm, which is in agreement with the width of a laser scanning track. The result revealed a further relationship between β columnar grain and laser scanning track. Additionally, the high dislocation density, stacking faults and the typical ( 10 1 ¯ 1 ) twinning were identified in the as-built sample. The twinning was filled with many dislocation lines that exhibited apparent slip systems of climbing and cross-slip. Moreover, the α + β phase with fine dislocation lines and residual twinning were observed in the stress relieving sample. Furthermore, both as-built and stress-relieved samples had a better homogeneous density and finer grains in the center area than in the edge area, displaying good mechanical properties by Feature-Scan. The α’ phase resulted in the improvement of tensile strength and hardness and decrease of plasticity, while the newly generated β phase resulted in a decrease of strength and enhancement of plasticity. The poor plasticity was ascribed to the different print mode, remained support structures and large thermal stresses. View Full-Text
Keywords: selective laser melting; Ti6Al4V alloy; martensitic transformation; texture evolution; mechanical properties selective laser melting; Ti6Al4V alloy; martensitic transformation; texture evolution; mechanical properties
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MDPI and ACS Style

He, J.; Li, D.; Jiang, W.; Ke, L.; Qin, G.; Ye, Y.; Qin, Q.; Qiu, D. The Martensitic Transformation and Mechanical Properties of Ti6Al4V Prepared via Selective Laser Melting. Materials 2019, 12, 321. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12020321

AMA Style

He J, Li D, Jiang W, Ke L, Qin G, Ye Y, Qin Q, Qiu D. The Martensitic Transformation and Mechanical Properties of Ti6Al4V Prepared via Selective Laser Melting. Materials. 2019; 12(2):321. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12020321

Chicago/Turabian Style

He, Junjie, Duosheng Li, Wugui Jiang, Liming Ke, Guohua Qin, Yin Ye, Qinghua Qin, and Dachuang Qiu. 2019. "The Martensitic Transformation and Mechanical Properties of Ti6Al4V Prepared via Selective Laser Melting" Materials 12, no. 2: 321. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12020321

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