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Article

Volt-Var Curve Reactive Power Control Requirements and Risks for Feeders with Distributed Roof-Top Photovoltaic Systems

Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800 MS 1033, Albuquerque, NM 87185, USA
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Energies 2020, 13(17), 4303; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13174303
Received: 10 July 2020 / Revised: 13 August 2020 / Accepted: 14 August 2020 / Published: 19 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Photovoltaic Energy Systems for a Sustainable Future)
The benefits and risks associated with Volt-Var Curve (VVC) control for management of voltages in electric feeders with distributed, roof-top photovoltaic (PV) can be defined using a stochastic hosting capacity analysis methodology. Although past work showed that a PV inverter’s reactive power can improve grid voltages for large PV installations, this study adds to the past research by evaluating the control method’s impact (both good and bad) when deployed throughout the feeder within small, distributed PV systems. The stochastic hosting capacity simulation effort iterated through hundreds of load and PV generation scenarios and various control types. The simulations also tested the impact of VVCs with tampered settings to understand the potential risks associated with a cyber-attack on all of the PV inverters scattered throughout a feeder. The simulation effort found that the VVC can have an insignificant role in managing the voltage when deployed in distributed roof-top PV inverters. This type of integration strategy will result in little to no harm when subjected to a successful cyber-attack that alters the VVC settings. View Full-Text
Keywords: hosting capacity; volt-var curve; photovoltaic; voltage management; electric feeder hosting capacity; volt-var curve; photovoltaic; voltage management; electric feeder
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jones, C.B.; Lave, M.; Reno, M.J.; Darbali-Zamora, R.; Summers, A.; Hossain-McKenzie, S. Volt-Var Curve Reactive Power Control Requirements and Risks for Feeders with Distributed Roof-Top Photovoltaic Systems. Energies 2020, 13, 4303. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13174303

AMA Style

Jones CB, Lave M, Reno MJ, Darbali-Zamora R, Summers A, Hossain-McKenzie S. Volt-Var Curve Reactive Power Control Requirements and Risks for Feeders with Distributed Roof-Top Photovoltaic Systems. Energies. 2020; 13(17):4303. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13174303

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jones, C. B., Matthew Lave, Matthew J. Reno, Rachid Darbali-Zamora, Adam Summers, and Shamina Hossain-McKenzie. 2020. "Volt-Var Curve Reactive Power Control Requirements and Risks for Feeders with Distributed Roof-Top Photovoltaic Systems" Energies 13, no. 17: 4303. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13174303

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