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Pathways for Low-Carbon Transition of the Steel Industry—A Swedish Case Study
Open AccessArticle

Roadmap for Decarbonization of the Building and Construction Industry—A Supply Chain Analysis Including Primary Production of Steel and Cement

1
Department of Space, Earth and Environment, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden
2
Department of Economics, University of Gothenburg, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Energies 2020, 13(16), 4136; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13164136
Received: 2 July 2020 / Revised: 30 July 2020 / Accepted: 3 August 2020 / Published: 10 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enhancement of Industrial Energy Efficiency and Sustainability)
Sweden has committed to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to net-zero by 2045. Around 20% of Sweden’s annual CO2 emissions arise from manufacturing, transporting, and processing of construction materials for construction and refurbishment of buildings and infrastructure. In this study, material and energy flows for building and transport infrastructure construction is outlined, together with a roadmap detailing how the flows change depending on different technical and strategical choices. By matching short-term and long-term goals with specific technology solutions, these pathways make it possible to identify key decision points and potential synergies, competing goals, and lock-in effects. The results show that it is possible to reduce CO2 emissions associated with construction of buildings and transport infrastructure by 50% to 2030 applying already available measures, and reach close to zero emissions by 2045, while indicating that strategic choices with respect to process technologies and energy carriers may have different implications on energy use and CO2 emissions over time. The results also illustrate the importance of intensifying efforts to identify and manage both soft and hard barriers and the importance of simultaneously acting now by implementing available measures (e.g., material efficiency and material/fuel substitution measures), while actively planning for long-term measures (low-CO2 steel or cement). View Full-Text
Keywords: construction; building; supply chain; decarbonization; roadmap; heavy industry; CO2 emissions; carbon abatement; emissions reduction; climate transition construction; building; supply chain; decarbonization; roadmap; heavy industry; CO2 emissions; carbon abatement; emissions reduction; climate transition
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Karlsson, I.; Rootzén, J.; Toktarova, A.; Odenberger, M.; Johnsson, F.; Göransson, L. Roadmap for Decarbonization of the Building and Construction Industry—A Supply Chain Analysis Including Primary Production of Steel and Cement. Energies 2020, 13, 4136.

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