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Article

Arsenic Accumulation and Physiological Response of Three Leafy Vegetable Varieties to As Stress

1
College of Agriculture and Forestry, Longdong University, Qingyang 745000, China
2
Gansu Key Laboratory of Protection and Utilization for Biological Resources and Ecological Restoration, Qingyang 745000, China
3
College of Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Xiangyang 712100, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Fayuan Wang, Liping Li, Lanfang Han and Aiju Liu
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(5), 2501; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19052501
Received: 31 December 2021 / Revised: 18 February 2022 / Accepted: 18 February 2022 / Published: 22 February 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Soil Pollution and Remediation)
Arsenic (As) in leafy vegetables may harm humans. Herein, we assessed As accumulation in leafy vegetables and the associated physiological resistance mechanisms using soil pot and hydroponic experiments. Garland chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum coronarium L.), spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were tested, and the soil As safety threshold values of the tested leafy vegetables were 91.7, 76.2, and 80.7 mg kg−1, respectively, i.e., higher than the soil environmental quality standard of China. According to growth indicators and oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, the ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione, and soluble protein), the order of As tolerance was: GC > SP > LE. The high tolerance of GC was due to the low transport factor of As from the roots to the shoots; the high activity of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase; and the high content of phytochelatin in the roots. Results of this work shed light on the use of As-contaminated soils and plant tolerance of As stress. View Full-Text
Keywords: heavy metals; garland chrysanthemum; lettuce; antioxidant defense enzymes; GSH; PCs heavy metals; garland chrysanthemum; lettuce; antioxidant defense enzymes; GSH; PCs
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MDPI and ACS Style

Meng, Y.; Zhang, L.; Yao, Z.-L.; Ren, Y.-B.; Wang, L.-Q.; Ou, X.-B. Arsenic Accumulation and Physiological Response of Three Leafy Vegetable Varieties to As Stress. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 2501. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19052501

AMA Style

Meng Y, Zhang L, Yao Z-L, Ren Y-B, Wang L-Q, Ou X-B. Arsenic Accumulation and Physiological Response of Three Leafy Vegetable Varieties to As Stress. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(5):2501. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19052501

Chicago/Turabian Style

Meng, Yuan, Liang Zhang, Zhi-Long Yao, Yi-Bin Ren, Lin-Quan Wang, and Xiao-Bin Ou. 2022. "Arsenic Accumulation and Physiological Response of Three Leafy Vegetable Varieties to As Stress" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 5: 2501. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19052501

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