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Article

Accuracy of a Smartphone Application Measuring Snoring in Adults—How Smart Is It Actually?

1
Department of Orthodontics, Justus-Liebig University Giessen, 35392 Giessen, Germany
2
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Diakonie Klinikum Jung-Stilling Siegen, 57074 Siegen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Kneginja Richter and Antje Büttner-Teleagă
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7326; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147326
Received: 17 May 2021 / Revised: 30 June 2021 / Accepted: 7 July 2021 / Published: 8 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Treatment of Insomnia and Sleep Disorders)
About 40% of the adult population is affected by snoring, which is closely related to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and can be associated with serious health implications. Commercial smartphone applications (apps) offer the possibility of monitoring snoring at home. However, the number of validation studies addressing snoring apps is limited. The purpose of the present study was to assess the accuracy of recorded snoring using the free version of the app SnoreLab (Reviva Softworks Ltd., London, UK) in comparison to a full-night polygraphic measurement (Miniscreen plus, Löwenstein Medical GmbH & Co., KG, Bad Ems, Germany). Nineteen healthy adult volunteers (4 female, 15 male, mean age: 38.9 ± 19.4 years) underwent simultaneous polygraphic and SnoreLab app measurement for one night at home. Parameters obtained by the SnoreLab app were: starting/ending time of monitoring, time in bed, duration and percent of quiet sleep, light, loud and epic snoring, total snoring time and Snore Score, a specific score obtained by the SnoreLab app. Data obtained from polygraphy were: starting/ending time of monitoring, time in bed, total snoring time, snore index (SI), snore index obstructive (SI obstructive) and apnea-hypopnea-index (AHI). For different thresholds of percentage snoring per night, accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Comparison of methods was undertaken by Spearman-Rho correlations and Bland-Altman plots. The SnoreLab app provides acceptable accuracy values measuring snoring >50% per night: 94.7% accuracy, 100% sensitivity, 94.1% specificity, 66.6% positive prediction value and 100% negative prediction value. Best agreement between both methods was achieved in comparing the sum of loud and epic snoring ratios obtained by the SnoreLab app with the total snoring ratio measured by polygraphy. Obstructive events could not be detected by the SnoreLab app. Compared to polygraphy, the SnoreLab app provides acceptable accuracy values regarding the measurement of especially heavy snoring. View Full-Text
Keywords: application; app; eHealth; mHealth; obstructive sleep apnea; OSA; smartphone; snoring application; app; eHealth; mHealth; obstructive sleep apnea; OSA; smartphone; snoring
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MDPI and ACS Style

Klaus, K.; Stummer, A.-L.; Ruf, S. Accuracy of a Smartphone Application Measuring Snoring in Adults—How Smart Is It Actually? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7326. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147326

AMA Style

Klaus K, Stummer A-L, Ruf S. Accuracy of a Smartphone Application Measuring Snoring in Adults—How Smart Is It Actually? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(14):7326. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147326

Chicago/Turabian Style

Klaus, Katharina, Anna-Lena Stummer, and Sabine Ruf. 2021. "Accuracy of a Smartphone Application Measuring Snoring in Adults—How Smart Is It Actually?" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 14: 7326. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147326

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