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Article

Impacts of a Standing Desk Intervention within an English Primary School Classroom: A Pilot Controlled Trial

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National Centre for Sport and Exercise Medicine, School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK
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NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Centre—Lifestyle Theme, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK
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Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong 3220, Australia
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Bradford Institute for Health Research, Bradford Teaching Hospitals Foundation Trust, Bradford BD9 6RJ, UK
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Centre for Applied Education Research, Wolfson Centre for Applied Health Research, Bradford Teaching Hospitals Foundation Trust, Bradford BD9 6RJ, UK
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Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford OX3 0BP, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7048; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197048
Received: 28 July 2020 / Revised: 19 September 2020 / Accepted: 23 September 2020 / Published: 26 September 2020
Traditional classroom furniture dictates that children predominantly sit during class time. This study evaluated the impact of providing standing desks within a deprived UK primary school setting over 8 months using mixed-method approaches. All children within a Year 5 class (9–10-year-olds, n = 30) received an adjustable sit–stand desk, while another Year 5 class (n = 30) in a nearby school retained traditional furniture as a control classroom. At baseline, 4 months, and 8 months, activPAL monitors (PAL Technologies, Glasgow, UK) were worn for 7 days to provide time spent sitting and standing. Behavior-related mental health, musculoskeletal discomfort surveys, and a cognitive function test battery were also completed at all three timepoints. Intervention experiences from pupils and the teacher were captured using focus groups, interviews, and classroom observations. At both 4 months and 8 months, multi-level models revealed a reduction in class time sitting in the intervention group compared to the control group ((β (95%CI) 4 months −25.3% (−32.3, −18.4); 8 months −19.9% (−27.05, −12.9)). Qualitative data revealed challenges to teaching practicalities and a gradual decline in behavior-related mental health was observed (intervention vs. control: 4 months +5.31 (+2.55, +8.08); 8 months +7.92 (+5.18, +10.66)). Larger trials within similar high-priority settings are required to determine the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of providing standing desks to every child in the classroom. View Full-Text
Keywords: sitting time; standing desks; sit–stand desk; children; primary school; classroom interventions; physical activity sitting time; standing desks; sit–stand desk; children; primary school; classroom interventions; physical activity
MDPI and ACS Style

Sherry, A.P.; Pearson, N.; Ridgers, N.D.; Johnson, W.; Barber, S.E.; Bingham, D.D.; Nagy, L.C.; Clemes, S.A. Impacts of a Standing Desk Intervention within an English Primary School Classroom: A Pilot Controlled Trial. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7048. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197048

AMA Style

Sherry AP, Pearson N, Ridgers ND, Johnson W, Barber SE, Bingham DD, Nagy LC, Clemes SA. Impacts of a Standing Desk Intervention within an English Primary School Classroom: A Pilot Controlled Trial. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(19):7048. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197048

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sherry, Aron P., Natalie Pearson, Nicola D. Ridgers, William Johnson, Sally E. Barber, Daniel D. Bingham, Liana C. Nagy, and Stacy A. Clemes 2020. "Impacts of a Standing Desk Intervention within an English Primary School Classroom: A Pilot Controlled Trial" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 19: 7048. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197048

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