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Food System Transformation: Integrating a Political–Economy and Social–Ecological Approach to Regime Shifts
Open AccessEditorial

Towards More Sustainable Food Systems—14 Lessons Learned

1
Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, University of Padua, 35131 Padua, Italy
2
Water and Environmental Engineering Group, University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 7QF, UK
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 4005; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17114005
Received: 28 May 2020 / Accepted: 3 June 2020 / Published: 4 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards More Sustainable Food Systems)
Food production, processing, distribution and consumption are among the major contributors to global environmental change. At the same time, food systems need to effectively respond to the demands of a growing world population, and already today many communities and individuals are affected by food insecurity. Moving towards sustainable food value chains is one of the greatest and most complex challenges of this century. To explore promising solutions and specific problems in this context, and to discuss achieved progress, this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health was initiated. The publications enrich our knowledge about essential changes required in the food systems, such as more effective food distribution, avoidance or valorisation of food waste and less meat consumption. Knowing what to change and knowing how to actually achieve such change are two different themes. It becomes evident that there is still an incomplete picture regarding how innovations in the food system can be strengthened to catalyse transformations at a larger scale. Grassroot initiatives require more supporting efforts to effectively influence policies, and the lack of coordination among civil society initiates must be overcome. Sustainability-oriented companies in food supply chains also have a major role to play. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainability in the food sector; food supply chains; food insecurity; food waste and loss; innovation and change; food governance sustainability in the food sector; food supply chains; food insecurity; food waste and loss; innovation and change; food governance
MDPI and ACS Style

Kusch-Brandt, S. Towards More Sustainable Food Systems—14 Lessons Learned. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4005.

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