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Open AccessArticle

Loneliness, Family Communication, and School Adjustment in a Sample of Cybervictimized Adolescents

1
Departament of Health Psychology, Miguel Hernández University, Avda. de la Universidad s/n, 03202 Alicante, Spain
2
Department of Education and Social Psychology, Pablo Olavide University, 41013 Seville, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 335; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010335
Received: 5 December 2019 / Revised: 27 December 2019 / Accepted: 28 December 2019 / Published: 3 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional and Behavioural Adjustment in Adolescence)
The objective of this study was to compare individual, family, and social variables, such as the perception of loneliness, family communication, and school adjustment in a sample of 2399 Andalusian (Spanish) adolescents aged 12 to 18 (M = 14.63, SD = 1.91) suffering from cybervictimization (low, moderate, and high). The results show that adolescents suffering from high cybervictimization report more loneliness, more problematic communication with both parents, and worse school adjustment than the rest of the groups. Regarding gender, differences are observed in open communication with the mother and in the dimensions of school adjustment, being more favorable for girls. However, there were no significant differences between girls and boys in the loneliness variable. The interaction effects indicate, on the one hand, that female severe cybervictims present more avoidant communication with the mother than the other groups, and, on the other hand, that male cybervictims of all three groups and female severe cybervictims have lower academic competence than the group of female low cybervictims, followed by female moderate cybervictims. These data support the idea that, depending on its intensity and duration, cybervictimization affects girls and boys differently in terms of individual, family, and social variables. View Full-Text
Keywords: loneliness; family communication; school adjustment; cyberbullying; victim; gender differences loneliness; family communication; school adjustment; cyberbullying; victim; gender differences
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Cañas, E.; Estévez, E.; León-Moreno, C.; Musitu, G. Loneliness, Family Communication, and School Adjustment in a Sample of Cybervictimized Adolescents. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 335.

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