Next Article in Journal
Smoking Cessation and Vaping Cessation Attempts among Cigarette Smokers and E-Cigarette Users in Central and Eastern Europe
Next Article in Special Issue
Intervention Strategies to Elicit MVPA in Preschoolers during Outdoor Play
Previous Article in Journal
Care Farming Program for Family Health: A Pilot Study with Mothers and Children
Previous Article in Special Issue
Associations of Leisure-Time Physical Activity Trajectories with Fruit and Vegetable Consumption from Childhood to Adulthood: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study
Article

Establishing a Scientific Consensus on the Cognitive Benefits of Physical Activity

1
Department of Psychology, Education and Child Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, 3062 PA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
2
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, School of Education, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Callaghan NSW 2308, Australia
3
School of Education/Early Start, University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2522, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010029
Received: 4 November 2019 / Revised: 12 December 2019 / Accepted: 14 December 2019 / Published: 18 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Healthy Lifestyle)
Research suggests that physical activity can be used as an intervention to increase cognitive function. Yet, there are competing views on the cognitive effects of physical activity and it is not clear what level of consensus exists among researchers in the field. The purpose of this study was two-fold: Firstly, to quantify the scientific consensus by focusing on the relationship between physical activity and cognitive function. Secondly, to investigate if there is a gap between the public’s and scientists’ interpretations of scientific texts on this topic. A two-phase study was performed by including 75 scientists in the first phase and 15 non-scientists in the second phase. Participants were asked to categorize article abstracts in terms of endorsement of the effect of physical activity on cognitive function. Results indicated that there was a 76.1% consensus that physical activity has positive cognitive effects. There was a consistent association between scientists’ and non-scientists’ categorizations, suggesting that both groups perceived abstracts in a similar fashion. Taken together, this study provides the first analysis of its kind to evaluate the level of consensus in almost two decades of research. The present data can be used to inform further research and practice. View Full-Text
Keywords: scientific consensus; physical activity; physical fitness; cognition; cognitive function; learning scientific consensus; physical activity; physical fitness; cognition; cognitive function; learning
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Nazlieva, N.; Mavilidi, M.-F.; Baars, M.; Paas, F. Establishing a Scientific Consensus on the Cognitive Benefits of Physical Activity. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 29. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010029

AMA Style

Nazlieva N, Mavilidi M-F, Baars M, Paas F. Establishing a Scientific Consensus on the Cognitive Benefits of Physical Activity. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(1):29. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010029

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nazlieva, Nesrin; Mavilidi, Myrto-Foteini; Baars, Martine; Paas, Fred. 2020. "Establishing a Scientific Consensus on the Cognitive Benefits of Physical Activity" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 1: 29. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010029

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop