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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Can Work Engagement Be a Resource for Reducing Workaholism’s Undesirable Outcomes? A Multiple Mediating Model Including Moderated Mediation Analysis

1
Department of Psychology, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, 8100 Caserta, Italy
2
Department of History, Society and Human Studies, University of Salento, 73100 Lecce, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(8), 1402; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081402
Received: 26 March 2019 / Revised: 14 April 2019 / Accepted: 16 April 2019 / Published: 18 April 2019
This study aimed to explore a possible process explaining the relationship between workaholism and sleep disorders, including two mediators: work–family conflict and emotional exhaustion. Moreover, since a possible buffering role of work engagement was recently proposed against the detrimental effects of workaholism, the aim was to examine the moderating role of work engagement in the relationship between workaholism and several outcomes such as work–family conflict, emotional exhaustion, and sleep disorders. Two models were tested using conditional process analysis for testing direct and indirect effects on a sample of 395 employees: (1) a serial multiple mediation model, and (2) the same serial multiple mediation model including the moderating role of work engagement. Results showed a significant mediating effect of both work–family conflict and emotional exhaustion. Moreover, work engagement moderated the relationship between workaholism and work–family conflict and the relationship between workaholism and emotional exhaustion. This work contributes to the understanding of the process underlying the relationship between workaholism and sleep disorders and to the literature reporting the possible protective role of work engagement on the negative outcomes of workaholism. Practical implications are also discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: workaholism; work engagement; work–family conflict; emotional exhaustion workaholism; work engagement; work–family conflict; emotional exhaustion
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Scafuri Kovalchuk, L.; Buono, C.; Ingusci, E.; Maiorano, F.; De Carlo, E.; Madaro, A.; Spagnoli, P. Can Work Engagement Be a Resource for Reducing Workaholism’s Undesirable Outcomes? A Multiple Mediating Model Including Moderated Mediation Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1402.

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