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Open AccessArticle

Calibration of Self-Reported Time Spent Sitting, Standing and Walking among Office Workers: A Compositional Data Analysis

1
Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational Health Sciences and Psychology, University of Gävle, 80637 Gävle, Sweden
2
Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(17), 3111; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173111
Received: 2 July 2019 / Revised: 23 August 2019 / Accepted: 25 August 2019 / Published: 27 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Physical Activity and Public Health)
We developed and evaluated calibration models predicting objectively measured sitting, standing and walking time from self-reported data using a compositional data analysis (CoDA) approach. A total of 98 office workers (48 women) at the Swedish Transport Administration participated. At baseline and three-months follow-up, time spent sitting, standing and walking at work was assessed for five working days using a thigh-worn accelerometer (Actigraph), as well as by self-report (IPAQ). Individual compositions of time spent in the three behaviors were expressed by isometric log-ratios (ILR). Calibration models predicting objectively measured ILRs from self-reported ILRs were constructed using baseline data, and then validated using follow-up data. Un-calibrated self-reports were inaccurate; root-mean-square (RMS) errors of ILRs for sitting, standing and walking were 1.21, 1.24 and 1.03, respectively. Calibration reduced these errors to 36% (sitting), 40% (standing), and 24% (walking) of those prior to calibration. Calibration models remained effective for follow-up data, reducing RMS errors to 33% (sitting), 51% (standing), and 31% (walking). Thus, compositional calibration models were effective in reducing errors in self-reported physical behaviors during office work. Calibration of self-reports may present a cost-effective method for obtaining physical behavior data with satisfying accuracy in large-scale cohort and intervention studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical activity; sedentary behavior; office work; accuracy; calibration; compositional data analysis physical activity; sedentary behavior; office work; accuracy; calibration; compositional data analysis
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Hallman, D.M.; Mathiassen, S.E.; van der Beek, A.J.; Jackson, J.A.; Coenen, P. Calibration of Self-Reported Time Spent Sitting, Standing and Walking among Office Workers: A Compositional Data Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3111.

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