Next Article in Journal
The Distribution of Available Prevention and Management Interventions for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (2007 to 2017): Implications for Collaborative Actions
Previous Article in Journal
Effectiveness of Enzyme Dentifrices on Oral Health in Orthodontic Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Previous Article in Special Issue
A Survey of Rural Residents’ Perception and Response to Health Risks from Hot Weather in Ethnic Minority Areas in Southwest China
Article Menu
Issue 12 (June-2) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

The Use of a Quasi-Experimental Study on the Mortality Effect of a Heat Wave Warning System in Korea

1
School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
2
Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
3
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health and Scripps Institute of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(12), 2245; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16122245
Received: 30 April 2019 / Revised: 17 June 2019 / Accepted: 17 June 2019 / Published: 25 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extreme Weather Events and Health)
  |  
PDF [1034 KB, uploaded 25 June 2019]
  |  

Abstract

Many cities and countries have implemented heat wave warning systems to combat the health effects of extreme heat. Little is known about whether these systems actually reduce heat-related morbidity and mortality. We examined the effectiveness of heat wave alerts and health plans in reducing the mortality risk of heat waves in Korea by utilizing the discrepancy between the alerts and the monitored temperature. A difference-in-differences analysis combined with propensity score weighting was used. Mortality, weather monitoring, and heat wave alert announcement data were collected for 7 major cities during 2009–2014. Results showed evidence of risk reduction among people aged 19–64 without education (−0.144 deaths/1,000,000 people, 95% CI: −0.227, −0.061) and children aged 0–19 (−0.555 deaths/1,000,000 people, 95% CI: −0.993, −0.117). Decreased cardiovascular and respiratory mortality was found in several subgroups including single persons, widowed people, blue-collar workers, people with no education or the highest level of education (university or higher). No evidence was found for decreased all-cause mortality in the population (1.687 deaths/1,000,000 people per day; 95% CI: 1.118, 2.255). In conclusion, heat wave alerts may reduce mortality for several causes and subpopulations of age and socio-economic status. Further work needs to examine the pathways through which the alerts impact subpopulations differently. View Full-Text
Keywords: hot temperature; mortality; heat waves; extreme heat; climate change; quasi-experiment; vulnerability; adaptation; heat action plans hot temperature; mortality; heat waves; extreme heat; climate change; quasi-experiment; vulnerability; adaptation; heat action plans
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Heo, S.; Nori-Sarma, A.; Lee, K.; Benmarhnia, T.; Dominici, F.; Bell, M.L. The Use of a Quasi-Experimental Study on the Mortality Effect of a Heat Wave Warning System in Korea. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2245.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top