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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 6920-6938; doi:10.3390/ijerph10126920
Article

Using Formative Research to Design a Behavior Change Strategy to Increase the Use of Improved Cookstoves in Peri-Urban Kampala, Uganda

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Received: 9 September 2013 / Revised: 29 November 2013 / Accepted: 30 November 2013 / Published: 10 December 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Behavior and Public Health)
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Abstract

Household air pollution from cooking with biomass fuels negatively impacts maternal and child health and the environment, and contributes to the global burden of disease. In Uganda, nearly 20,000 young children die of household air pollution-related pneumonia every year. Qualitative research was used to identify behavioral determinants related to the acquisition and use of improved cookstoves in peri-urban Uganda. Results were used to design a behavior change strategy for the introduction of a locally-fabricated top-lit updraft gasifier (TLUD) stove in Wakiso district. A theoretical framework—opportunity, ability, and motivation—was used to guide the research and behavior change strategy development. Participants consistently cited financial considerations as the most influential factor related to improved cookstove acquisition and use. In contrast, participants did not prioritize the potential health benefits of improved cookstoves. The theoretical framework, research methodology, and behavior change strategy design process can be useful for program planners and researchers interested in identifying behavioral determinants and designing and evaluating improved cookstove interventions.
Keywords: household air pollution; indoor air pollution; improved cookstoves; behavioral change; formative research; qualitative research; health technology; theoretical framework; Uganda household air pollution; indoor air pollution; improved cookstoves; behavioral change; formative research; qualitative research; health technology; theoretical framework; Uganda
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Martin, S.L.; Arney, J.K.; Mueller, L.M.; Kumakech, E.; Walugembe, F.; Mugisha, E. Using Formative Research to Design a Behavior Change Strategy to Increase the Use of Improved Cookstoves in Peri-Urban Kampala, Uganda. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 6920-6938.

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