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Article

Modification of Bacteriophages to Increase Their Association with Lung Epithelium Cells In Vitro

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Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre (WISB) and School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
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Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
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Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
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Department of Genetics and Genome Biology, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Paul Hyman, Christine Schneider and Bryan Gibb
Pharmaceuticals 2021, 14(4), 308; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph14040308
Received: 6 February 2021 / Revised: 10 March 2021 / Accepted: 24 March 2021 / Published: 1 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacteriophages as Therapeutic Delivery Vehicles)
There is currently a renaissance in research on bacteriophages as alternatives to antibiotics. Phage specificity to their bacterial host, in addition to a plethora of other advantages, makes them ideal candidates for a broad range of applications, including bacterial detection, drug delivery, and phage therapy in particular. One issue obstructing phage efficiency in phage therapy settings is their poor localization to the site of infection in the human body. Here, we engineered phage T7 with lung tissue targeting homing peptides. We then used in vitro studies to demonstrate that the engineered T7 phages had a more significant association with the lung epithelium cells than wild-type T7. In addition, we showed that, in general, there was a trend of increased association of engineered phages with the lung epithelium cells but not mouse fibroblast cells, allowing for targeted tissue specificity. These results indicate that appending phages with homing peptides would potentially allow for greater phage concentrations and greater efficacy at the infection site. View Full-Text
Keywords: phage therapy; bacteriophage T7; marker-based engineering; homing peptide; synthetic biology phage therapy; bacteriophage T7; marker-based engineering; homing peptide; synthetic biology
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MDPI and ACS Style

Grigonyte, A.M.; Hapeshi, A.; Constantinidou, C.; Millard, A. Modification of Bacteriophages to Increase Their Association with Lung Epithelium Cells In Vitro. Pharmaceuticals 2021, 14, 308. https://doi.org/10.3390/ph14040308

AMA Style

Grigonyte AM, Hapeshi A, Constantinidou C, Millard A. Modification of Bacteriophages to Increase Their Association with Lung Epithelium Cells In Vitro. Pharmaceuticals. 2021; 14(4):308. https://doi.org/10.3390/ph14040308

Chicago/Turabian Style

Grigonyte, Aurelija M., Alexia Hapeshi, Chrystala Constantinidou, and Andrew Millard. 2021. "Modification of Bacteriophages to Increase Their Association with Lung Epithelium Cells In Vitro" Pharmaceuticals 14, no. 4: 308. https://doi.org/10.3390/ph14040308

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