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Review

Smart Wearables for Cardiac Monitoring—Real-World Use beyond Atrial Fibrillation

1
Hannover Heart Rhythm Center, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Hannover Medical School, 30625 Hannover, Germany
2
Liverpool Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L1 8JX, UK
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA
4
Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902, USA
5
Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902, USA
6
Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Shared senior authorship.
Academic Editor: Carlo Massaroni
Sensors 2021, 21(7), 2539; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21072539
Received: 2 March 2021 / Revised: 29 March 2021 / Accepted: 30 March 2021 / Published: 5 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Wearables for Cardiac Monitoring)
The possibilities and implementation of wearable cardiac monitoring beyond atrial fibrillation are increasing continuously. This review focuses on the real-world use and evolution of these devices for other arrhythmias, cardiovascular diseases and some of their risk factors beyond atrial fibrillation. The management of nonatrial fibrillation arrhythmias represents a broad field of wearable technologies in cardiology using Holter, event recorder, electrocardiogram (ECG) patches, wristbands and textiles. Implementation in other patient cohorts, such as ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), heart failure or sleep apnea, is feasible and expanding. In addition to appropriate accuracy, clinical studies must address the validation of clinical pathways including the appropriate device and clinical decisions resulting from the surrogate assessed. View Full-Text
Keywords: wearables; remote monitoring; cardiac monitoring; artificial intelligence; arrhythmia; heart failure; digital health; mobile health wearables; remote monitoring; cardiac monitoring; artificial intelligence; arrhythmia; heart failure; digital health; mobile health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Duncker, D.; Ding, W.Y.; Etheridge, S.; Noseworthy, P.A.; Veltmann, C.; Yao, X.; Bunch, T.J.; Gupta, D. Smart Wearables for Cardiac Monitoring—Real-World Use beyond Atrial Fibrillation. Sensors 2021, 21, 2539. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21072539

AMA Style

Duncker D, Ding WY, Etheridge S, Noseworthy PA, Veltmann C, Yao X, Bunch TJ, Gupta D. Smart Wearables for Cardiac Monitoring—Real-World Use beyond Atrial Fibrillation. Sensors. 2021; 21(7):2539. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21072539

Chicago/Turabian Style

Duncker, David, Wern Yew Ding, Susan Etheridge, Peter A. Noseworthy, Christian Veltmann, Xiaoxi Yao, T. Jared Bunch, and Dhiraj Gupta. 2021. "Smart Wearables for Cardiac Monitoring—Real-World Use beyond Atrial Fibrillation" Sensors 21, no. 7: 2539. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21072539

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