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Open AccessArticle

Comfortable and Convenient Turning Skill Assessment for Alpine Skiers Using IMU and Plantar Pressure Distribution Sensors

1
Sports Brain Science Project, NTT Communication Science Laboratories, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation, Atsugi 243-0198, Japan
2
Department of Information Processing, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503, Japan
3
Department of Bio-science and Engineering, Shibaura Institute of Technology, Saitama 337-8570, Japan
4
Institute of Innovative Research, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Basilio Pueo
Sensors 2021, 21(3), 834; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21030834
Received: 29 December 2020 / Revised: 21 January 2021 / Accepted: 23 January 2021 / Published: 27 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensor Technology for Sports Science)
Improving ski-turn skills is of interest to both competitive and recreational skiers, but it is not easy to improve on one’s own. Although studies have reported various methods of ski-turn skill evaluation, a simple method that can be used by oneself has not yet been established. In this study, we have proposed a comfortable method to assess ski-turn skills; this method enables skiers to easily understand the relationship between body control and ski motion. One expert skier and four intermediate skiers participated in this study. Small inertial measurement units (IMUs) and mobile plantar pressure distribution sensors were used to capture data while skiing, and three ski-turn features—ski motion, waist rotation, and how load is applied to the skis—as well as their symmetry, were assessed. The results showed that the motions of skiing and the waist in the expert skier were significantly larger than those in intermediate skiers. Additionally, we found that the expert skier only slightly used the heel to apply a load to the skis (heel load ratio: approximately 60%) and made more symmetrical turns than the intermediate skiers did. This study will provide a method for recreational skiers, in particular, to conveniently and quantitatively evaluate their ski-turn skills by themselves. View Full-Text
Keywords: sports performance; skill assessment; inertial measurement units (IMU); plantar pressure distribution sensors; feature detection; ski; actual field evaluation sports performance; skill assessment; inertial measurement units (IMU); plantar pressure distribution sensors; feature detection; ski; actual field evaluation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Matsumura, S.; Ohta, K.; Yamamoto, S.-i.; Koike, Y.; Kimura, T. Comfortable and Convenient Turning Skill Assessment for Alpine Skiers Using IMU and Plantar Pressure Distribution Sensors. Sensors 2021, 21, 834. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21030834

AMA Style

Matsumura S, Ohta K, Yamamoto S-i, Koike Y, Kimura T. Comfortable and Convenient Turning Skill Assessment for Alpine Skiers Using IMU and Plantar Pressure Distribution Sensors. Sensors. 2021; 21(3):834. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21030834

Chicago/Turabian Style

Matsumura, Seiji; Ohta, Ken; Yamamoto, Shin-ichiroh; Koike, Yasuharu; Kimura, Toshitaka. 2021. "Comfortable and Convenient Turning Skill Assessment for Alpine Skiers Using IMU and Plantar Pressure Distribution Sensors" Sensors 21, no. 3: 834. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21030834

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